Home Forums General Chat Outer Space and Astronomy The point of discovering the Universe – A philosophical take

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Expires on 11/20/2018

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    • #60215
      System
      Participant

      From early age I was interested in the universe and physics. Though, until now, I haven’t pursuit a career in that sector, I nevertheless kept an eye on news and did my own thinking in regards to the point of discovering the universe, it’s expansion and especially the course of it’s creation.

       

      As I see it, everything in the universe as we know it, is built from smaller parts.

       

      A simplified example: The universe is made up of galaxies, galaxies of solar systems, solar systems of planets orbiting a star just like all life forms on this planet are made up of organs which are made up of cell clusters which are made up of cells which are made up of atoms.

       

      So every small piece is part of a larger which is part of a larger and so on.

       

       

      Scientists and people interested in the subject, are asking: “Where do we come from?” and “What is outside the universe?” or “What was before the Big Bang?”

       

      So I’m asking in return: “What is the point of knowing?”

       

      If we find out what was before the Big Bang or what lies outside the universe, then what?

      The next logical step would be to ask “What was before the Pre-Big Bang?, What lies outside the Post-Universe?”

       

      It appears to be nothing but an endless spiral of questions, just like the question: Why are we here?

       

      Even if we find the answers, it’ll only bring up more questions which answers will bring up more questions and so on, keeping the focus away from what’s going on in this planet, this society.

       

      As much as I love exploring and as curious as I am to see what’s out there and what was before the Big Bang, I think there are more pressing matters governments and organizations should focus on before we can think of exploring what’s beyond our own world.

       

      Currently, if we did discover other inhabitable planets, inhabited or not, we’d be nothing more but the locust aliens depicted in all those Sci-Fi movies, with aliens coming to our planet to harvest our resources in total disregard for us.

      We’d just be moving from one planet to another, till they are as ruined as is our world and then move on to the next.

       

       

      What are your thoughts?

       

       



      Expires on 11/20/2018

    • #101851
      SolCommand
      Participant

      Asking and wondering is in our nature, it’s pretty much what got us to where we are today, it’s how technology is invented and things are discovered, thou I do agree with what you said on the other subject. If and when we’ll get at the tech level to go to other planets we will undoubtebly be considered the invader and for some reason I do not believe we will be adopting a policy like in Star Trek of “no interference” if the planet has life on it, instead I think we’ll go all out and harvest the heck out of the resources of that planet(s). That however is a long long long way from now and this is probably the biggest “hidden” regret I have, that I will not be around to see mankind journey to the stars and experience it for myself.

      Getting back to the questions subject, I for one hope we will always be asking ourselves those questions and many more others, else I do not see the point of living if we do not advance our knowledge as a specie. That’s the whole point of it I believe, to become better and smarter as a race and we can’t do that if we’re not curious as to how we came to be here and where we’re heading.

      As to “why are we here?” I do not think there’s a reason for that or by no means the will of a “higher power” as said by all these religions, that’s just nonsense talk that started thousands of years ago by some delusional people and got perpetuated throughout the years by means of weapons and fear. There will come a day when all that will be ancient history and no one will remember this, and I can’t wait for that day to come. This thing alone is what kept us in the dark and stopped us from asking questions that should’ve been asked a long time ago and pretty much discredited or killed anyone who dared to think outside the box or the ones that were ahead of their time in their thinking.

       

      So, bottom line is we need to ask questions, even if that leads to even more questions, that is we actually want to advance of course.

    • #101852
      Anonymous

       

       

      I wasn’t questioning the fact that we ask questions or saying we should stop doing so, but I was wondering what the point, if there won’t ever be a definitive answer. It’s like the famous question “What came first: The egg or the hen?”. 

      And should there be a definite answer, then what? It won’t change a thing in the way mankind behaves or thinks I believe, hence why I ask what’s the point if doing so. As long as money rules the world we still will only be a plague to any planet we may inhabit.

       

      Furthermore I’d not think that religion is nonsense, despite being atheist (though some people certainly take it too far). Science cannot prove that there is no god, as little as any religion can prove that there is. So I think we’re on pretty even ground.

      I believe, seeing the vastness of the universe, that there are other inhabited planets and that there could be intelligent life far more developed than we are. Hence, I also believe, the ‘God/s’ people believe in, may not be as their religious leaders teaches them. Plenty of knowledge got lost during the centuries, due to wars, lack of interest or knowledge of conservation or simply due to wrong translations and interpretations.

       

      In the past people were quick to call God who’s power they couldn’t explain. So it might as well be that this god they believe in may just be another life form which we haven’t discovered yet (or maybe it’s even something within ourselves, which we forgot we had).

       

      Either way, there is no doubt that religion gives people strength and hope in rough times, and lots of good came from it as well bad, so I’d not want to generalize it.

      Atheists want to be free to express their views, so we should respect other views as much as we want ours to be respected.

    • #101853
      MvGulik
      Participant

      It seems to me that most of this topic belongs more in the “Political and World Discussions” section.

      (Well, actually its a more “philosophical” than “space” section type topic, but there is no such section)

       

      I think the question, from a “Outer Space and Astronomy” view, is kinda answered by SolCommand.

       

      On the other parts … well. Where generally kinda greedy and are prone to innate “conflicts of interest” issues/behavior. Combined with a generally short term vision is not helping either.

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