Home Forums PC and Console Gaming What is your current PC config?

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    • #56933
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      What is your current rig specs that you use for gaming and do you plan on upgrading soon?

      Use this example to list your machine specs:

      Code:
      CPU:
      Memory:
      HDD:
      Gfx Card:
      Snd Card:
      Input/Joystick:
    • #62944
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      CPU: Core2Duo 6420

      Memory: 2GB

      HDD: 1x 120 and 2x300GB

      Gfx Card: MSI GeForce 8800 GTS 640MB

      Snd Card: Fatal1ty Extreme 64MB

      Input/Joystick: Mouse/Keyboard … Joystick broken 😥

      I thought about upgrading this year but will more than likely do it next year after reading the min/max system requirements of some upcoming games.

    • #62945

      CPU: AMD Phenom II X 940 Black Edition (3 GHz)

      Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-MA790FX-UD5P

      Memory: 8 Gigs Kingston HyperX 1066 mhz (OC’d to 1333)

      HDD: 1 320 gig Split in half for Dual Boot Vista 64 and XP, 2x 750 7200 rpm Game Storage Drives

      Gfx Card: ATI HD 4860 1 GiG DDR3

      Snd Card: See MainBoard (Latest Realtek HD Dolby Pro Chip)

      Input/Joystick: G-15 KB, G-11 Mouse, Thrustmaster Cougar HOTAS JS Sytem

    • #62946
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Nice rig Omega. I have been debating whether to go with Phenom II for my next build is it a solid performer for you so far? And Kingston rocks for memory that’s all I ever buy and there support is great.

    • #62947

      absoulutly the best AMD since the the 486 dx4 120 – having been a system builder most of my career I’ve always used AMD (except for the K5 era that was a dark time for AMD) for gameing they’ve always preformed well for me and my clients AND most of the time they’re significantly cheaper then thier Intel Counterparts – btw the x 955 BE should be out soon about 3.4 ghz and has been tested to stable OC @ over 7 GHz

    • #62948
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Safe OC up to 7Ghz that is truly amazing. You would think if they could OC it that high why not just step up the chip at the factory and come out with 5-6Ghz chips and get people snatching them up and put pressure on Intel. AMD has to do something innovative because there stock isn’t doing that great and I think the only thing that keeps them really in business is the low prices on their chips and ATI gfx cards.

      But I hope to build another machine for myself for Xmas, that’s only if Santa can still afford it after all the kids 🙂

    • #62949

      CPU: Intel Core2Duo 3ghz

      Memory: 2048mb Kingston 800mhz

      HDD: Western Digital 320gb SATA2

      Gfx Card: Asus/nVidia GF8800GT 1024mb

      Snd Card: M-Audio (damn, can’t remember which model… the basic one!)

      Input/Joystick: Saitek X52 Flight Control System, Saitek Eclipse keyboard, Logitech G5 mouse, Wingman Formula Force GP wheel

      I have yet to find a game that slows it down dramatically with everything maxed. It has breezed through Doom3 and Quake4, rFactor racing sim with a full grid, and EVE fleet battles of 50vs50 with all bells and whistles turned on 🙂

    • #62950
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Well I broke down and going to upgrade my PC. It is a small upgrade from what I have now but this way the cycling of computers through the house please everyone. I picked out everything needed for the new PC and you will love the price at the end…

      GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4P Motherboard – http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6813128387

      Acer X233Hbid Black 23″ 5ms HDMI Full 1080P Widescreen LCD – http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6824009163

      3.5 Floppy Drive

      SAPPHIRE 100269SR Radeon HD 4890 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready – http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6814102830

      Thermaltake V9 Black Edition ATX Computer Gaming Chassis – http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6811133074

      OCZ StealthXStream 700w PSU – http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6817341019

      AMD Phenom II X4 940 Deneb 3.0GHz – http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6819103471

      4GB G.Skill DDR2 1066 Memory – http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6820231166

      Samsung 750GB HD – http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6822152099

      Even came with a 4GB USB Stick all for the price of $1014 that’s with the shipping. I couldn’t pass up the deal almost every item was on sale. That AMD CPU was under $200 and only processor higher is the 3.2Ghz plus the AMD’s can overclock like mad 🙂 I will upgrade to 8GB memory once I get my hands on Windows 7 and if I have the extra cash come Xmas I might get another Radeon HD 4890 for crossover.

      If I get some of the rebates back (which total over $50) I will have built this pretty good machine for under $1000 not bad at all. Oh I left out the sound because I already have a Soundblaster Fata1ty gamer board and a Lite-On dual layer burning going to use. I’ll take some pics when I get it all, its my birthday this weekend so I bought a present I will use 🙂

      What ya think? Oh NewEgg you rock!

    • #62951

      Yeah… that baby’s gonna rock !!! Post some FPS tests when you get it 🙂

    • #62952

      Pinback
      Participant

      At this time a very VERY small notbook with intergrated graphic and a mighty atom processor 😆 (bet you all green with envy 😆 😆 )so it looks like I will not be playing any games 😥

    • #62953
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator
      PINBACK wrote:
      At this time a very VERY small notbook with intergrated graphic and a mighty atom processor 😆 (bet you all green with envy 😆 😆 )so it looks like I will not be playing any games 😥

      Pinback did you have another PC before the notebook? What happened to it?

      r3dfiv3 wrote:
      Yeah… that baby’s gonna rock !!! Post some FPS tests when you get it 🙂

      What should I use to benchmark the system and I will post what I have. I haven’t modified the new system at all and haven’t tweaked anything all stock settings. Actually I think maybe my memory timings might be off but I need to do some reading on how to set them up just right to get the best FSB speed.

    • #62954

      OS XP Pro Sp 3

      CPU: Intel 2 Quad Q6600@2.4 GHz

      Memory: 4GB of Corsair running 3.25 used

      HDD:

      Gfx Card: 8800 GTS

      Snd Card: none

      Input/Joystick: S 52x pro

    • #62955

      Pinback
      Participant
      Darkone wrote:
      PINBACK wrote:
      At this time a very VERY small notbook with intergrated graphic and a mighty atom processor 😆 (bet you all green with envy 😆 😆 )so it looks like I will not be playing any games 😥

      Pinback did you have another PC before the notebook? What happened to it?

      I have a big box pc,but it’s not with me at the moment.Although it’s in need of an upgade

    • #62956

      Bas

      OS:

      XP Home SP3

      Processor:

      AMD Athlon(tm) 64 Processor 2800+, MMX, 3DNow, ~1.8GHz

      Memory:

      1024MB RAM

      Hard Drive:

      160 GB

      Video Card:

      RADEON 9550

      Gamecontroller:

      Eh, it is my bro’s thingy, from logitech, very cloned from the PS controllers, lol ^^

      Just a q – Do you use a real joystick or a gamepad for space-sims?

    • #62957
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Since I haven’t updated my specs since my new system build here they are…

      CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 940 Deneb 3.0GHz

      Memory: 4GB G.Skill DDR2 1066 Memory

      HDD: 1x 750GB and 1x 300GB

      Gfx Card: SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 4890 1GB w/ 256-bit GDDR5

      Snd Card: SB Fatal1ty Gamer

      Input/Joystick: Logitech Attack 3 ($40 cheapo)

      Bas wrote:
      Just a q – Do you use a real joystick or a gamepad for space-sims?

      Joystick personally. But I would love to be able to play using my PS3 Bluetooth controller that would be great. I have too look into that to see if there is some hacks available.

    • #62958

      Main Left:

      Code:
      CPU: iNtel Ci7 920
      Memory: 12GB (6x 2GB)
      HDD: 750GB and then some
      Gfx Card: GTX285 + 8600GT
      Snd Card: onboard
      Input/Joystick: Razor copperhead mouse
      nv 3D geforce vision + 120hz monitor

      Right side:

      Code:
      CPU: X2 4400+
      Memory: 2GB
      HDD: 500GB
      Gfx Card: HD2900XT + PPU
      Snd Card: onboard
      Input/Joystick: A Mouse

      Upgrade oh yes.

      Planning on replacing my HD2900XT for 5870 2GB, need something DX11 but aren’t in a hurry next year or so. There isn’t out a dX11 game I like.

      Lookin for a windows home server.

      Windows 7 family edition for all my 3 gameRigs. Waiting for a dutch verion.

      So I lookin for a full native using DX11 Space game. But Aim afraid I wont find any 🙁

    • #62959
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      You running a 64bit OS on the first rig SuperG? Because 32bit OS doesn’t support that much memory. There still isn’t any DX10 space games 🙂

      JGE and BP will probably have modes for DX10 I would guess. I wanted to get the ATI 5870 but wasn’t out when I built, so far my 4890 runs everything with settings on full without issue.

    • #62960

      Isn’t there a 64bit version of XP? If so, I’d like to pick it up. XP only sees 3GB of ram, not the full 4GB that I have installed.

      I bought 2 Radeon 4850s when I built my rig several months ago because I read somewhere that, at the time, 2 4850s in crossfire configuration out-performed the best $600 cards. In hindsight I think I would’ve been better off spending the money I spent on 2 4850s and picked up something really nice, like a 4890 (How much were those several months ago?). Reason being, nothing in winXP is even capable of reading crosffire, so when I play a game it’s as if it’s running off one card only. And even on my Vista boot paratition, only a handful of games are crossfire enabled. What’s the damn point?? Wish somebody told me before I built my rig…

    • #62961
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      I build all my PC’s and do lots of reading before I make all equipment choices for the guts of the system. But it has paid off, I never have system crashes and the PC’s usually go through the house cycle without issue (me, wife, kids).

      The 4890 I bought this year and think I found a great deal on NewEgg for $210 at the time. I probably won’t even waste my time buying XP 64bit Shant. I would just get Win7 64 bit professional (has winXP built ito OS). I usually just get a single gfx card that is beefy and not go with the SLI/CF because the extra money would be better spent on more memory and a top of the line MB.

    • #62962

      I build my PC since 80386 even put a weitec Co_PU in 80387 socket. I prefere to put full mem capacity upfront. So I wont have to upgrade that. So CPU maybe for a afordable 6core. And gcards.

      For DX11 Gcard, TMSC has some problem producing 40nm chips. So AMD can’t keep up with demand. but I don’t mind as there isn’t any DX11 game out yet that I realy want to play.

      Don’t like Raceing games. so don’t care about Dirt in DX11. Wenn there comes a DX11 I realy want then i go look out for a DX11 card.

      Maybe sooner if I want to fool around with the DX11 SDK with dX11 hardware.

      OS used:

      X2 3200+ X1800XL XP 32

      X2 4400+ HD 2900XT Vista Ultimate 64

      X2 5400+ Vista Ultimate 64 // currently disasembled

      Ci7 GTX285 8600GT Vista 64 premium (W7 RC build 7100)

      I think I was 64bit ready from june 2007. But I had just 2GB

    • #62963

      farcodev
      Participant
      Code:
      current system:
      CPU: Athlon X2 4400+ (3800+ o/c since 2 years)
      Memory: 2Gb
      HDD: 1.3Tb in total
      Gfx Card: 7900GTX/512Mb
      Snd Card: Audigy
      Input/Joystick:keyb/mous
      OS: XP 32bits

      Code:
      system i’ll buy in 2010:
      CPU:i920/950/960 (i’ll see when i’ll be ready in march/april)
      Memory:6gb
      HDD:dunno yet
      Gfx Card:a 285 or 295
      Snd Card:
      Input/Joystick:
    • #62964
      Darkone wrote:
      I probably won’t even waste my time buying XP 64bit Shant. I would just get Win7 64 bit professional (has winXP built ito OS).

      I’ve been reluctant to mess with Windows 7 at this point because I’ve had so many issues with Vista. At least with Windows XP, everything just works. No crashes, no nothing. And I keep hearing about people having compatibility issues with Windows 7. Have you not encountered anything like that?

    • #62965
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      I know I took Vista off my machine and put XP back on but I do have Win7 Pro at the house and will eventually put it on. Overall Win7 is a lot better product than Vista and hearing good things from people and reviews. XP is now starting to be feature limited and soon you won’t see those nice visuals you see in game screenshots because XP won’t support DirectX10-11.

    • #62966

      There’s not much wrong with early vista if you keep just these two rulez in mind, way back then.

      1 ) It has a new driver model so every hardware vendor you use, need deliver or have avaible for DL, brand new Vista drivers. Some company do very well for some of there hardware early on. Other won’t release one much later or never. And focus on new hardware. Also in very competing hardware the Vista version runs behind XP.

      2 ) It has higher ( memory ) requierments.

      So some don’t

      Don’t put it on old hardware because you often will not comply to mem requierments.

      Some hardware just isn’t supported. That your problem and your first party that can help you will be the vendor of that hardware. if not. Solution is stick to XP.

      Some do’s.

      Build your system after Vista release to decent Vista spects. Like 2GB no less And something DX9 ish GPU

      Use Components with already steady Vista support.

      Pitfalls.

      Some OEM put Vista on cheap underspect systems like NEtbooks or real cheap PC or note books. With little memory and weak CPU’s. That are just bad buys. A cat in a bag.

      Falls bashing

      Trow a Vista copy on old to realy old underspect hardware. But Linux and XP run’s so well on it!!! Then stick with that.

      Bad Vista experience garanteed.

      Buy or build a cheap underspect PC but you took heavy weight Vista, that is just bad OS choice.

      Today there SP2 for Vista. Driver support is high Os is mature.

      W7 is just a name chance to avoid the bad name Vista is brandmarked with. W7 is a Vista refresh. A SP2 extended a second edition.

      Vista paved the way for W7. the chicken egg problem with drivers has taken on Vista.

      W7 has a OEM Netbook version. A light version for light spect hardware. Not in retail avaible. For Vista there was later a special XP OEM deal.

      So i did my homework and with that have a good Vista experience for Years.

      I would go for W7 for new bells and whistles. Better SSD and multitouch support.

      Mem prices are low for some time so comply to mem spect is currently no problem, compared back in the early day’s of vista.

      Vista game performce. nV ruled the marked in those days. But have also Vista driver problems. And demanded from MS to make some DX10 Features optional. Like Virtual video memory architecture driver support. Because nV was the main dX10 target market. MS complies. ATI(AMD) was better Vista and DX10 ready but out of sight R600 disaster. The retail GPU market is hard and unforgiving. And XP vs Vista game review where exclusive nV only. Until one took ATI also into play and was suprised.

      Now Vista has it’s market share and AMD and nV are up to level for vista driver support.

      Have nV for PhysX and 3DGeforceVision,TWIMTBP games. And a AMD rig for GITG games

      That’s my argumentated opinion about Vista.

    • #62967

      I have a dual boot system so I had a great chance to compare/contrast XP and Vista. Games do look/play better on Vista, that much is beyond question. It could be simply because Vista has dx10 and XP has dx9, not sure.

      Vista has way too much garbage programs running in the background. Before I upgraded my fan, I couldn’t play games on Vista because my system would overheat and crash. And it wasn’t just games. If I tried to run a resource heavy program, it would overheat and crash. Same games/programs in XP? No problem.

      XP starts up much faster too. Probably because I’ve widdled down the startup processes to around 16 or 17. In Vista, the lowest I could get the number of running processes down to was in the mid 30s’.

    • #62968
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator
      SuperG wrote:
      I would go for W7 for new bells and whistles. Better SSD and multitouch support.

      I want a SSD drive for my next system since the price on them now is just a wee bit to high for my blood. Vista was a resource hog on my machine for a while but I had a lot of crap installed on the machine. I have Win7 64bit waiting to install I just haven’t found the time to off load all my crap unto another drive.

      I did run into some ‘microsoft certified driver’ issues with some of my older hardware which was a pain sometimes but I hear Win7 is really good and hope to put it on my machine during the Xmas holiday sometime.

    • #62969
      Darkone wrote:
      SSD drive … the price on them now is just a wee bit to high for my blood.

      Don’t feel as though you are missing anything huge. SSD drives are only fast at searching. Transfer rates are 30-100x faster for SATA disk drives. Also, SSD’s have a finite number of read-write cycles, so you know from the start that your expensive SSD drive will eventually fail (although maybe not much sooner than your disk drive).

      SSD’s are awesome for things like tiny laptops or netbooks because they boot quickly, are low-power, and are fantastically rugged compared to a disk drive. But, overall, SSD’s are slower than disk drives in general-purpose use.

      I think I read somewhere that you build your own boxes, so maybe the following perspective will help. Use your SSD drive for your system drive, which typically experiences many seeks against many small files. For swap space and any large kind of data (ie, games), use a hard disk.

      With that perspective in mind, you could do a proof-of-concept by using a flash drive rather than an SSD for your system drive. An SSD is just a flash drive with an SATA interface, so it will give you a pretty good idea of what to expect from a future SSD. A $20 flash drive is big enough for Windows, as long as you put swap space, programs, and data elsewhere.

      B

    • #62970

      Wow I can’t believe that…I thought the whole point of SSD was speed and to eliminate moving parts so as to last longer. If they’re slower than SATA and they’re gonna break down around the same time, and they’re many times the price per GB…what incentive is there to buy them??

    • #62971
      Shant wrote:
      Wow I can’t believe that…I thought the whole point of SSD was speed and to eliminate moving parts so as to last longer. If they’re slower than SATA and they’re gonna break down around the same time, and they’re many times the price per GB…what incentive is there to buy them??

      Well, there are some terrific advantages to SSD’s for some applications. For those jobs, they probably are worth the extra cost. But SSD’s are not better in every way than hard drives… not even close.

      Think about using a phone book (remember those big paper things that people had before Switchboard and Google?). It takes a certain amount of time to find a name that you are looking for, and a different amount of time to copy the phone number, address, etc. If you use a photocopier then you can speed up the copy part of the job but you don’t speed up the lookup part.

      Similarly, disk drives have two major kinds of speed that approximately summarize their performance: Seek Time (lookup) and Transfer Rate (copy time). There are other specs of interest, but those are the two most popular.

      SSD’s are perhaps 100x faster than disk drives at Seek Time. Even faster than that in some cases.

      Hard drives are 100x faster than SSD’s at Transfer Rate (sometimes more).

      So, sure, SSD’s are very fast at some tasks. Other tasks perform better on hard disks.

      Boot performance is, by and large, a non-issue for big computers. They stay on all the time, so it usually doesn’t matter if they take several minutes to boot. Some servers take 10 minutes or more to boot, but they get booted perhaps a dozen times a year.

      However, boot performance is a HUGE issue for portable devices like, say, a phone. If your phone took more than a second or two to wake up, you would not be happy, right? Laptops are in between — people who carry them around a lot like to put them in standby or hibernation mode and want them to be able to wake up quickly. SSD’s are good at that part — the waking up or booting.

      On the other hand, for large multimedia jobs, database work, games, and other tasks that work with large files, a hard disk’s superior transfer rate will blow the socks off of any SSD.

      A few years ago, the life span of flash memory was an issue. Now they are good for millions of read/write cycles, which is not so bad. But there is more to reliability than lifetime. A hard disk, for example, can read and write until it dies of old age or damage. And therein is the key to SSD’s advantage — they are not as vulnerable to damage as hard disks. Hard disks are quickly destroyed by heat (which they generate a lot of) and shock. Shock is common for laptops, like dropping your laptop or even bumping it while it is writing to disk.

      SSD’s are nearly invulnerable to shock. They are vulnerable to heat, but they do not generate as much heat as a hard drive, so they have less trouble with heat.

      Also, SSD’s can be MUCH smaller than a disk drive for the same capacity. It’s just a couple of chips, after all.

      So SSD’s are fast at boot/waking up, rugged, cool, low-power, and small. All of those factors are good in portable applications.

      But SSD’s will not be replacing your disk drive for your gaming computer anytime soon.

      B

    • #62972

      It boggles my mind that SATA drives transfer data 100x faster than SSD. I thought the whole reason hard drives took as long as they did to transfer data was because of the…for lack of better term ‘manual’ way it works. What exactly is it that prevents SSD drives from transferring at the same/faster clip? Will they catch up to or surpass hard drives eventually?

      I’ve been of the opinion that hard drives have been seriously lagging in terms of advancement behind other components. I build my own rigs as well, but prior to this computer the last time I’d built one was around 99 or 2000. Didn’t do any gaming with it ofcourse. it had a standard ata hard drive in it. Extremely slow compared to today’s drives…on paper anyway. When I built this new rig several months ago, I put the fastest available SATA drives in it and naturally was expecting a big boost in the data transfer department. Honestly, I can’t tell any difference. Moving a couple gigs from one drive to another, or from one part of the same drive to another, still takes a few minutes like my old computer did.

      I was looking forward to SSD drives really advancing the ball in that department. Guess I was wrong.

    • #62973
      Shant wrote:
      It boggles my mind that SATA drives transfer data 100x faster than SSD….

      I thought … hard drives took as long as they did … because of the … ‘manual’ way it works.

      What exactly is it that prevents SSD drives from transferring at the same/faster clip?

      Will they catch up to or surpass hard drives eventually?

      Short Version: Look at RAID 0 (or 0+1) rather than SSDs for a major performance boost.

      Long Version: Back in the days when supercomputers were the size of a tractor trailer, there were folks who advised, “Never trust a computer that you can see over the top of.” 🙂 In those days, there was a lot of talk about the difference between “cpu speed” and computer “throughput”. Nobody talks about it that way anymore, but the concepts still hold. There are many different parts of a computer, and the overall throughput of the machine is dictated by the bottlenecks caused by the slowest individual components.

      Hard drives have evolved at a pretty good clip. The second IBM PC — not even the first — had a 5 megabyte disk drive that cost several hundred bucks. Now you can buy a terabyte drive (a million times larger) for under $99. Speeds are way up, too… but so is the size of the data that you move around. If you take a closer look at the number of megabytes per second that you transfer between drives, I’ll bet that you are moving many more bytes now than you did a few years ago.

      In fact, disk drives became so fast that their transfer rates exceeded the fastest rate that the old parallel ATA bus (16 parallel wires) could handle. The limiting factor was the speed of sending an electrical signal (reliably) through the wires themselves! It’s sort of a long topic, but wires do not transmit electricity at the speed of light… and several wires together may have different speeds, so there were a lot of electronics involved in splitting up bits across multiple wires and then putting them back together at the other end. Electronics can be pretty fast, but there are still limits. In order to keep controller costs down, it was necessary to develop a new technology, which turned into the Serial ATA “bus” (kinda-sorta-one wire, plus a couple more for power and control signals).

      SSD “drives” are just memory with an SATA controller so that they can be used in place of a disk drive without any other changes to the computer. Most of the SSD drives that you hear about use flash memory. Flash memory is far cheaper than the RAM that does most of the calculation work in a computer, which makes it economical to consider using flash instead of a hard disk for some applications. Flash memory also does not require power to hold it’s memory state, so you can turn off the power and not lose your information, just like a disk drive.

      Although flash is cheaper than RAM, it is not nearly as fast. To fully explain why takes me about an afternoon — I actually teach a class on this. But the short version is that a bit of flash memory is much larger than a bit of RAM, and size roughly equals speed in semiconductors. Smaller = Faster.

      You are partially correct in that the mechanical nature of disk drives limits their Seek performance. So, yes, SSD’s are much faster in that department. But hard drives are very, very fast at reading and writing a lot of data. SSD’s will not surpass hard drives in performance or cost for handling large amounts of data anytime soon. Eventually we will run into physical limits regarding the size and speed of our current idea of semiconductors. That will lead to new technologies, and it is hard to guess what will happen to performance and cost then. It is conceivable that, 100 years from now, solid state memories might become more economical than hard drives. But it won’t happen until some major technology shift.

      There is more to the story… SSDs are faster at reading than they are at writing, for example. Again, that makes them better for things like the operating system, which doesn’t change rapidly compared to data. But anything that requires saving lots of memory will be much faster on a hard drive.

      Solid-state drives can be made that are much faster than a disk drive, but not with flash memory. A battery-backed RAM drive can do the job, but an 8GB RAM drive costs something like $600, compared to 1,000GB of disk for $100.

      But even a RAM drive is not all that much faster than a hard disk in most applications because it is limited by the performance of the SATA bus. So you spend a ton of money for a minuscule amount of drive space that loses its memory when it loses power, and you still don’t get a huge performance increase. 🙁

      You are also correct in thinking that disk performance is a major bottleneck in today’s computers. So, if you really want to speed up your disk drives, the way to do it is RAID 0 (or 0+1 if you want both speed and reliability). RAID 0 uses two or more identical disk drives in a way that splits up read and write across the drives. This has several advantages, but one obvious advantage is that it divides the transfer across two or more SATA channels, thereby multiplying the throughput of the array. This improves performance dramatically. It turns out that modern motherboards are approximately as fast as two SATA channels, so two drives in your array is all you need for a low-cost performance improvement.

      In other words, you can buy two 1-TB drives for $100 each and make a 2-TB array that is nearly double the throughput of a single hard drive. Server versions of Windows have RAID software built in, so that’s all you need — just two disk drives — to double your performance. It’s a sweet deal. With XP/Vista/Win7 you will need to add either software or a RAID card complete the job, but they are cheap these days, too. I wouldn’t be surprised if there is open-source RAID software, although I have never looked.

      The bottom line is that SSDs are not the answer to overall disk performance, but the cheapest possible RAID configuration is.

      B

    • #62974
      Bullwinkle wrote:

      Short Version: Look at RAID 0 (or 0+1) rather than SSDs for a major performance boost.

      B

      Yeah, I’ve got 2 500g SATAs in the computer and I was tempted to make a raid array but I put redundancy/insurance well above speed…as much as I love speed. Hard drives fail all the time. I lost 10 years of mp3s, classical music performances that I’ll never be able to find again because an ata drive died on me less than 2 weeks after purchased. Part of the reason I was so looking forward to SSD. I’m assuming defective drives out of the box are much more rare with SSD, no?

      I’d built a raid array on my old computer, and perhaps things have changed now, but at the time if one drive failed, your data’s gone. Is that still the case? I do realize, ofcourse, that the solution would just be to get another drive and keep that one to backup the raid array. I’ll definitely do that eventually because you’re right, that’s a cheap way to damn near double the speed. You can’t beat that.

      Bullwinkle wrote:
      If you take a closer look at the number of megabytes per second that you transfer between drives, I’ll bet that you are moving many more bytes now than you did a few years ago.

      B

      I’d considered this possibility, but you have to remember that I didn’t transition from my old crappy computer to this top of the line one gradually. I built the new one and literally in 6 hours I went from one to the other. So I was in a very good position to see the contrast between old and cutting edge hardware. The result? I was very surprised in general at just how subtle the increases were. Only the graphics department gave me the type of boost I was expecting from a decade’s worth of advancement. To give an idea, it took me about 30-35 minutes to convert an mpeg movie to DVD. Now it takes about 7-8 minutes. I suppose another decade and I’ll be able to shave 15 seconds off my startup time…:roll:

      Specifically pertaining to hard drive performance, I ran data transfer tests on my old system’s hard drives. I had several hard drives in it, 2 of which were striped RAID 0. The newest non raid drive transferred at around 50MB/sec. The raid array transferred at 80mb/sec, so you’re right it’s nearly double the speed. I really should run the same test on my new system, it’ll be fun to test your theory. On paper my new drives are supposed transfer data 6 times faster than my old drives. I’m betting it’s well less than double.

      hmmm…I can’t find that utility at the moment…do you know of a simple HD data transfer utility I can download?

      Bullwinkle wrote:
      It’s sort of a long topic, but wires do not transmit electricity at the speed of light…

      OK this explains a lot. I had always assumed that wires did transmit at near light speed, and that it was only the mechanics of hard drives acting as a barrier to that speed. Why don’t they transfer at light speed, and roughly how fast DO they transfer (relative to light speed)?

      Bullwinkle wrote:
      It is conceivable that, 100 years from now, solid state memories might become more economical than hard drives. But it won’t happen until some major technology shift.

      The cost issue has always puzzled me as well. I realize new technology will always cost more in the beginning, but shouldn’t it be much cheaper to manufacture a SSD than a hard drive, and shouldn’t that be reflected in retail prices relatively soon?

      Bullwinkle wrote:
      But even a RAM drive is not all that much faster than a hard disk in most applications because it is limited by the performance of the SATA bus. So you spend a ton of money for a minuscule amount of drive space that loses its memory when it loses power

      2 questions on this…if the SATA bus were not a limiting factor, how much faster would a RAM drive be than SATA?

      And, how do you use such a drive if it loses memory when you turn it off? You have to transfer all your data over to a hard drive every time you shut the computer off???

      Bullwinkle wrote:
      With XP/Vista/Win7 you will need to add either software or a RAID card complete the job, B

      You mean I could create a RAID array with nothing but software?? That really makes it much more tempting…I needed a card to do it on my old computer.

    • #62975
      Shant wrote:
      I’ve got 2 500g SATAs in the computer and I was tempted to make a raid array but I put redundancy/insurance well above speed

      I have the same concern, which is why I build RAID 0+1 (RAID 10) arrays for my machines. RAID 0+1 is just what it sounds like… striping for performance and mirroring for redundancy. It uses 4 drives (minimum), but it doubles your performance while giving you more or less instant duplication of your drives.

      Shant wrote:

      I’m assuming defective drives out of the box are much more rare with SSD, no?

      I don’t know any statistics, but hard drive infant-mortality failures are not super-common. There will be the occasional early failure with SSDs, too.

      Whether it takes a week, a month, or a year, or a decade for a failure, you still need backups. There is no permanent way to store data without re-copying it from time to time. Even optical disks develop errors after ten years or so (sooner if abused, obviously).

      Shant wrote:

      I’d built a raid array on my old computer, and perhaps things have changed now, but at the time if one drive failed, your data’s gone.

      It depends on the type of array. Most professional arrays are far more reliable than single drives because they use some form of redundancy. There are several types, but RAID 1, 5, and 10 are the most common redundant types. The truth is that RAID 0 increases the likelihood per megabyte that you lose data (and maybe all of it) so, yeah, if the data is important then you want a notch up in sophistication.

      I mentioned RAID 0 and 10 because they give you the highest performance increase without a fancy (expensive) controller.

      Shant wrote:
      he solution would just be to get another drive and keep that one to backup the raid array

      Exactly. Inexpensive external drives rock for that.

      Shant wrote:

      I’ll definitely do that eventually because you’re right, that’s a cheap way to damn near double the speed. You can’t beat that.

      Right. Even better, it tends to be a bottleneck on most PCs, so doubling your performance there will make the computer “feel” much faster at many tasks. Assuming some kind of Core 2 cpu, I would say that disk performance is the second or third most significant performance enhancement, after adding lots of memory and maybe a decent video card with a lot of memory on it. Memory is 1,000 times faster than disk, so memory is Numero Uno.

      Shant wrote:

      I built the new one and literally in 6 hours I went from one to the other.

      OK, that’s a good comparison. But, wait…

      Shant wrote:

      it took me about 30-35 minutes to convert an mpeg movie to DVD. Now it takes about 7-8 minutes.

      That’s a 500% performance improvement in handling large data! What’s your beef, man?!

      That’s a huge speedup. There are a few things that contribute to it, but memory and disk are the biggest factors. CPU and system bus after that.

      Shant wrote:

      I suppose another decade and I’ll be able to shave 15 seconds off my startup time…:roll:

      My netbook boots Windows XP in about 15 seconds, and that’s with a puny Atom CPU and a slow-as-molasses 1.8 inch disk drive. Boot time can vary widely, but the more striped-down your PC is, the faster it will be.

      What operating system are you using?

      Shant wrote:

      I ran data transfer tests on my old system’s hard drives. I had several hard drives in it, 2 of which were striped RAID 0. The newest non raid drive transferred at around 50MB/sec. The raid array transferred at 80mb/sec, so you’re right it’s nearly double the speed.

      Nice improvement!

      Yes, it would be interesting to compare your new PC. It will be interesting to see how much faster than 50MB/s you get, but you should get a noticeable increase if you are going from PATA (old ATA) to SATA.

      Shant wrote:

      On paper my new drives are supposed transfer data 6 times faster than my old drives. I’m betting it’s well less than double.

      You will never know the full story. It is nearly impossible to test the transfer rate of a decent disk drive at home… you would need some expensive gear to get anywhere near the drive’s limit. Remember that your system bus and disk controller are slower than the drive itself. Plus, every time the spindle has to stop, seek a new sector, then start again, slows it down.

      So, yes, doubling your overall speed would be terrific. You will see the greatest improvement by copying a large, unfragmented file, from one drive on one controller to another drive on another controller. Even with that test your motherboard’s system bus may be the limiting factor.

      Shant wrote:

      hmmm…I can’t find that utility at the moment…do you know of a simple HD data transfer utility I can download?

      Hmmm… do you mean a benchmarking tool, or something to copy the complete contents of one drive to another?

      Check TomsHardware.com or ZDNet.com for a benchmarking tool, then pay attention to exactly what you are benchmarking. If you want to copy an entire drive, take a look at Acronis TrueImage. It is commercial software (maybe $50 for home computers), but it makes upgrading disk drives and making perfect backups a cinch.

      Shant wrote:

      Bullwinkle wrote:
      It’s sort of a long topic, but wires do not transmit electricity at the speed of light…

      OK this explains a lot. I had always assumed that wires did transmit at near light speed, and that it was only the mechanics of hard drives acting as a barrier to that speed. Why don’t they transfer at light speed, and roughly how fast DO they transfer (relative to light speed)?

      Didn’t I just say it is a long story?!

      OK… you know how they have highways in L.A. that are eight lanes wide? 8 lanes @ 60 mph with an average of, say, 100 feet of road length per car … they should be able to carry something like 400 cars per mile per minute when they are pretty full but not bumper-bumper. Now picture trying to drive 8 cars from the office parking lot to El Torito 1 exit away (let’s call it 1 mile just to make the numbers easy). So 8 cars / 400 cars per mile per minute = 1.2 seconds to get from work to lunch, right?

      🙂

      As you can see, it’s more complicated than just the width of the pipe. You have on-ramps and off-ramps to deal with, traffic, red lights, etc. It could take ten minutes to do that drive, depending on factors that have nothing to do with the bandwidth of the highway.

      When electricity flows through a wire it generates a magnetic field around the wire. Building that magnetic field takes time. When you stop the flow of electricity, it takes time for the field to collapse. The field is a form of energy, just as the electricity is. Think of building the field as “filling up the pipe” with energy, and collapsing the field as “draining the pipe”. This filling and draining (called “inductance”) is pretty slow compared to the speed of light. In order to send a “1” down the wire, you start at 0 voltage, increase to whatever a one is (say, 3v), then wait until the field stabilizes so that the voltage at the receiving end of the wire is a nice, steady, 3 volts, then drop the voltage back to 0 again. But the collapsing magnetic field continues to generate voltage at the receiving end until the field collapses so, again, there is a time lag before the receiving end sees a nice, steady, 0 volts.

      The inductance of the wire is comparable to the on-ramps and off-ramps of the highway.

      But there is more… when you put two wires side by side, the magnetic fields interact with each wire and induce currents in each other! So one wire that is supposed to be at 0v receives part of the magnetic field from the next wire, which partially raises the voltage in the wire that should be at 0!

      The beauty of digital signals is that we can throw out any signal that is not, say, at least 2.5 volts (1) or less than 0.5 volts (0). Anything in the middle is “noise” and we just ignore it, waiting until we see a clear 0 or 1. That waiting takes time. How much time depends on many factors, including temperature. So, in order to make sure that we get a good, clear, signal, we wait a little extra. Now, in order to move millions of those signals through a computer per second, we have a LOT of “red lights” and on/off ramps to consider, so computers use a “clock” to move everything in one complete step at a time. It’s like having a red light at every intersection. When you get a green light you accelerate (charge the field), drive, then decelerate (collapse the field) at the end of the block, wait at the red light until the next clock signal, then go again. If you are late and miss your green light, then you may have to sit and wait through almost a complete cycle before you have a chance to go again (an extra WAIT state, in computer lingo).

      Like traffic, if our signals collide they causes accidents (which show up as blue screens or other quirks), so we have to be ultra-careful that EVERY signal can get to it’s next “block” on each cycle of the clock. That means more waiting.

      All of this waiting is what makes travel through a computer slow. How slow? Slow enough that super-computer manufacturers used to use oscilloscopes and wire cutters to trim each wire to exactly the right length for that wire in order to minimize wasted clock cycles. It’s VERY slow compared to the speed of light.

      Does that make sense?

      Shant wrote:

      shouldn’t it be much cheaper to manufacture a SSD than a hard drive, and shouldn’t that be reflected in retail prices relatively soon?

      Semiconductor manufacturers (and many other commodity manufacturers) set volume pricing based on a Non-Recurring Engineering cost (NRE) and a per-unit cost. The NRE is, roughly, how much it costs to design, tool up for, fab, and test the first successful batch. After that, the per-unit charge kicks in, which covers cost of making the silicon, testing and other processing, and a bunch of other recurring costs. So the NRE cost of a cpu might be $10 million and the per-unit cost might be $25. You have to sell a lot of them before the price to the customer gets anywhere near that $25.

      In fact, long before the cost drops that far, a new CPU is released, and the customer starts paying for that NRE charge again.

      Costs don’t drop to their rock-bottom for a couple of years, at which time the unit is typically discontinued and replaced with something newer.

      Now, as you say, semiconductor densities increase over time, which reduces per-unit cost and improves performance. But disk drive technology is constantly improving as well, so it isn’t that easy for semiconductors to catch up to disk price/performance ratios.

      In fact, there is more room for improvement in disk drives than in the current way that we make semiconductors. We are already making semiconductors so small that we cannot draw the lines with a laser beam because it is too fat! The semiconductor manufacturers have to fire individual beams of electrons to make a thin enough line (e-beam lithography). That, in turn, requires a tool that is essentially a small linear accelerator. If that sounds mondo expensive, you’re right!

      So expect disk drive price-to-performance to continue to improve at its current rate, while semiconductor price-to-performance is already slowing down.

      In other words, until we have a MAJOR shift in the way that we make semiconductors, the price-to-performance for solid state memory will never beat hard drives. Eventually that technology shift will happen, but they’ve been working on it as long as they have been making semiconductors (roughly since the early 1960’s) and they haven’t come up with a good solution yet.

      IBM has a computer that uses super-cooled lead (Josephson Junctions) instead of silicon semiconductors to make a super-dense computer the size of a grapefruit, but it requires a refrigerator the size of a building to make the liquid helium that chills it… it’s not exactly home computer stuff. They made one, loaned it to the NSA, and that’s it. For now, at least.

      Shant wrote:

      if the SATA bus were not a limiting factor, how much faster would a RAM drive be than SATA?

      Good question. If we skipped the drive controller completely, then how would we attach our RAM drive to our computer? You probably know about “RAM disks” which are just software partitions in system memory that act like disk drives. Those things ARE fast — 1,000x disk drive speed. But they have to use a controller as well — the memory controller. The memory controller is much faster than the disk controller, but it cannot be put on a long cable. It pretty much has to be on the motherboard — and right next to the chipset at that. Gotta keep those ultra-high-speed wires short!

      So we could expand our memory controllers to hundreds of gigabytes, and that is precisely what 64-bit versions of Windows allow. Most computers built so far are limited to the 4GB that 32-bit Windows maxes out at. But newer machines are increasingly being developed that can take much larger memories. Modern servers can take 64-128GB of memory, or more… if you can afford it!

      So the way to get balls-out performance from solid state memory is by increasing system RAM rather than by using SSDs. It will cost you, but it will be fast.

      Shant wrote:

      how do you use such a drive if it loses memory when you turn it off?

      One way is, as you suggest, to load the drive every time you boot. You could use it for a swap drive, or maybe load up your game files on it and have an extremely fast “disk” while playing your game. But the disk would be “created” (by copying files from a hard disk) every time the system boots.

      Another way is to use battery backup on the RAM drive. As long as you keep power to your computer, the battery backup will keep your data alive. But don’t unplug the computer and put it in the closet for the summer, then expect your data to still be on the RAM drive when you plug it back in.

      In other words, a RAM drive is a temporary storage device, not a real replacement for a hard drive or a flash drive. That’s ok, because most folks cannot afford to have a RAM drive that is much larger than a USB key drive, anyway.

      Shant wrote:

      You mean I could create a RAID array with nothing but software??

      I will give that a qualified “yes”. Yes, you can. You may or may not need a different version of Windows to do it, but it can be done. Windows XP pro can, I think, do it, and it appears that Windows 7 pro can make RAID 0+1 as well. Interestingly, it looks as though all versions of Windows 7 can make a RAID 0 array, which is probably because Microsoft knows that it is their best chance to give their customers a cheap performance boost.

      OK, now there is one more “catch”. You can mirror (RAID 1) your system drive, but striping (RAID 0) is more complex. You need Windows installed to be able to build the array before you can install Windows on the array. So that means either two installations of Windows and a third (or fifth) disk drive, or a RAID controller. You could use any old disk drive from an old computer as the system drive to build the array, so that might be a solution for you.

      See, I told you it was a long story!

      Hope that helps.

      B

    • #62976

      After thinking about this a little more, here’s the cheapest and easiest way I can think of to add RAID to your current box:

        [*:2d6iyd8f]Leave your current system drive as it is.

        [*:2d6iyd8f]Get a third drive identical to your second drive. Make sure that these two drives are on two different SATA controllers.

        [*:2d6iyd8f]Stripe those two drives as RAID 0.

        [*:2d6iyd8f]Put your swap files, software, and data on the array.

        [*:2d6iyd8f]Use an external USB drive to back up both your system drive and your array.

      Total cost for this setup is around $200, and half of that goes to adding backup which you need anyway, for other reasons.

      Notes:

        [*:2d6iyd8f]Any version of Windows 7 or Windows XP Pro required. Steve Balmer (Microsoft CEO) says, “skip Vista”, and he should know. 🙂

        [*:2d6iyd8f]I am assuming that you already have at least 2GB of RAM and a video card capable of running Vista. If not, then fix those things first, before adding RAID.

        [*:2d6iyd8f]If you have less than 4GB of RAM, consider adding more memory (more than 4GB if your motherboard will handle it and you have a 64-bit version of Windows) before adding RAID. It’s a cost-benefit tradeoff, and what will be faster for the way you use your computer is hard to predict without more information. But think about maxing out your memory (or maxing out your budget

      on memory) as another excellent performance booster.

      Tip:

        [*:2d6iyd8f]If you buy a new version of Windows, make sure it is 64-bits. Your CPU can already handle 64 bits (assuming it is Core 2 Duo or more, or AMD equivalent). Memory is cheap enough now that there is no reason to use 32 bits on a machine that you want to perform well.

      B

    • #62977

      Bullwinkle, you’re the best.

      Did Steve Balmer really say that???

    • #62978
      Shant wrote:
      Bullwinkle, you’re the best.

      Did Steve Balmer really say that???

      Thanks for the kind words, Shant!

      Yes, Balmer did say it in answer to a question at a conference just about a year ago.

      To put it in context, the question was something like, “With Windows 7 coming up soon, should I hurry to install Vista now, or wait for Windows 7?”. Balmer was talking about how soon Windows 7 would be released, so he responded to the effect that the questioner might as well wait. I believe that the words “skip” and “Vista” were in the sentence.

      As you would expect, the press jumped all over that, and made kind of a semi-big-deal about Balmer telling the world to skip Vista. So it is part true, part tongue-in-cheek taking advantage of an awkward response to an awkwardly-timed question.

      But Balmer is a public figure, so he doesn’t get the benefit of the doubt. 😉

      And a lot of people think he was right.

      B

    • #62979
      PINBACK wrote:
      At this time a very VERY small notbook with intergrated graphic and a mighty atom processor 😆 (bet you all green with envy 😆 😆 )so it looks like I will not be playing any games 😥

      it’s more mighty mouse, it’s weak but very energy friendly. I missplaced my samsung N10. Have no clue where in house I put that little thing.

      But then again the next little Netbook thingie or tad bigger must have at least a touch screen.

    • #62980

      CPU: Intel Core i7 950 – Quad-Core 3.06GHz, 4.8GT/s, 8MB Cache Processor

      Memory: 12GB 1600MHz DDR3 Memory – Triple Channel Performance (6 x 2GB)

      OS Hard Drive: WDC 500GB, Ultra ATA100, 7200 rpm, 16MB Buffer Hard Driv

      Disk-intensive programs: 2x300GB WDC VelociRaptor Enterprise Class, SATA II, 10K RPM, 16MB Buffer – RAID 0 Array

      Audio Data: 2x1TB WDC Enterprise Class, SATA II, 7200 RPM, 32MB Buffer – RAID 0 Array

      Sound Card: Edirol FA-66

      GFX Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260, 896MB, PCI-Express, DUAL-DVI Video Card

      OS: Microsoft® Windows® 7 Professional x64 Edition

      Oh…and a Macbook Pro 😀

    • #62981

      My superiorly-awesome gaming rig.

      CPU: AMD64x2 5000+ Black edition 2.6-3.0ghz (depending on which protocal you ask)

      OS: Windows 7 64bit Ultimate

      OS drive: 10yo IDE 40gb HDD

      Other drive: 320gb SATA drive

      Audio: Intergrated baby! oooh yeah.

      GFX: 9600GT 512mb, PCI-e 2.0

      Memory: 4gbs generic awesome ram.

    • #62982
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Only two upgrades you need for your system Mogymog the gfx card and replace that 10yo drive 🙂 Integrated sound is usually fine unless you have the speaker setup for the surround.

    • #62983

      Hey, don’t be dissing on my 9600 man. This baby kicks butt. I’m find with 40+ FPS maxed up graphics on intensive games. I dont need the 100+ that the $400 5900 pumps out. And yeah, I would LOVE to replace my OS drive with an SSD, but saddly I don’t crap out money and the like $200 for the 60gb drives is a bit much for me right now.

      cides, not counting the SSD. I’m hoping by the end of this yeear to be able to make a new rig. A nice quad-core, with a really good cheap once since the 6-cores will be out in a few months quads are gonna drop like rocks. And maybe even an ATI 5800, if ATI can get off their butts and make a decent driver.

      Though I would love it if my OCing was ever stable, but THATS not gonna happen. Stupid mobo, and stupid interfacing.

    • #62984

      Aitor
      Participant

      Mine is:

      CPU: Intel Core Quad Q6600

      OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bits

      Memory: 4Gb

      HDD: 200 + 400 Gb

      Gfx Card: nVidia 7600GT 256Mb

      Snd Card: basic one 2.1

      I will upgrade my graphic card soon, going to get the ATI 5770 1Gb.

    • #62985

      CPU: Q6600 @ stock

      RAM: 4GB Corsair DDR2 1066

      GPU: Sapphire HD5850 1 GB

      HDD: 160 GB Maxtor SATA, 500GB Seagate SATA, 2 x 74GB WD Raptor 74 GB SATA

      Audio: Realtek Azalea onboard, Harman/Kardon Soundsticks II

      Input: Saitek Eclipse III, Razer Diamondback, X52 Pro

      OS: Windows 7 Professional x64

      Screens: LG W2286L, Cibox LE2262, Dell U2410

      What Bullwinkle said about RAID is true – RAID 0 gives excellent performance boosts at the cost of parity, RAID 0+1 (aka RAID 10) gives both but at the cost of additional drives. RAID 5 is an option though if your controller supports it (IIRC Intel ICH9R and ICH10R do, not sure about the AMD chipsets as it’s been a while since I used one). Basically get 3 drives the same size, set them up as RAID 5 and you’ll have both striping and a degree of mirroring at the cost of one drive’s capacity – e.g. 3 x 500 GB in a RAID 5 array gives you 1 TB of storage. 2 stripes of data and 1 for parity/error checking. It’s probably the most common enterprise solution and definitely has it’s merits.

      Windows Vista and Windows 7 support a certain degree of flimflammery though – you can have a RAID 0 volume software mirrored to another drive on the system as long as the capacitiy of the 3rd drive exceeds that of the RAID volume. You lose a little performance on write speeds but read speeds and access times are still very responsive. Admittedly, a 10k RPM drive helps on that score but they’re seriously LOUD! I love my Raptors but on occasion the incessant chattering gets a lttle bit irritating. The 500 GB I can’t hear unless I have everything muted and am listening out for it.

      RAID, in all it’s forms, offers a number of advantages but always at the same disadvantage – cost! SSDs are pretty much the same – the price of the NAND flash memory used to make them has gone through the roof at the moment so they’re very much an expensive luxury. The response times are absolutely ludicrous, as are the read and write times but at the cost of a serious dent in the wallet region. A 30GB OCZ Vertex (allegedly a nice drive) runs in at around £110, a 1 TB Samsung Spinpoint F3 is about £65. For £20 more than the SSD you could have a 2 TB RAID 0 volume, £85 more and you have a RAID 5 array – at 2TB in size as opposed to 30 GB. Speed, safety and storage combined.

      One thing I will disagre with Bullwinkle on though – you don’t have to have Windows installed to create a RAID volume. It’s dependant on what your RAID controller supports. If I switch either of my RAID controllers to RAID mode in the BIOS rather than AHCI then I have the option of building a RAID volume before the system even thinks about looking for a boot drive. This is on a motherboard with ICH9R as well as an additional RAID capable controller. Yes, you can definitely build the volumes in Windows (probably easiest) but many chipsets support hardware RAID which is definitely preferable on both ease of setup and speed basis. The speed isn’t really that important with today’s systems unless you’re running software that gives you a CPU bottleneck at which point anything less that your CPU has to deal with is a bonus. Not common nowadays but it used to be very prevalent on the average system that normal people could afford.

      Please accept my apologies for the wall of text in what is supposed to be a “Post your build” thread, I’m just a hardware geek at heart. I tend to be a touch vociferous when it comes to certain subjects 😳

    • #62986

      Yes . . . he waffles on a bit.

      CPU: Q6600 @ 2.45 GHz

      RAM: 4GB Corsair DDR2 1066

      GPU: Nvidia GeForce 8800GTX

      HDD: 500GB Seagate SATA

      Audio: Realtek Azalea onboard

      Input: Logitech MX518, Saitek X52

      OS: Windows Vista Home Premium x64

      Screens: LG L1900R LG L227W

      Not that fastest machine on the planet but it does the job.

    • #62987
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      I configure all my raids in bios/raid controller and not in windows. I find it a bit easier to work with myself than using all the windows tools. And for todays games if you have a quad, 4gb ram and a DX10 card you can run almost anything on full settings.

    • #62988

      Speaking of raiding.. Anyone else ever have problems with OCing anything? Such as, Windows, or windows based applications not registering the OC? Like my CPU is default OC at 2.8. Windows, and other programs like CPUZ, and such only register it as 2.6. BIOS says 2.8, if I up it to 3.0, Bios shows 3.0. Windows and the lot still say 2.6. Anyone know a way to make it register right?

    • #62989
      Grimloon wrote:

      What Bullwinkle said about RAID is true ..

      One thing I will disagre with Bullwinkle on though – you don’t have to have Windows installed to create a RAID volume.

      Thanks, Grimloon. I will add that my discussion with Shant was about adding performance to his existing computer on the cheap… which meant no additional hardware. In that case, Windows must be installed first, obviously.

      However, if you have a RAID card or your motherboard has a RAID controller then, by all means, use it. As Darkone points out, a RAID controller makes installation simpler (although not necessarily higher performance, regardless of what the RAID vendor claims).

      I have done a lot of RAIDing… from cheap to million-dollar systems. RAID is great, but the claims of RAID vendors tend to be strong on hype and weak on real-life-performance details. In other words, you will actually get higher performance without a RAID controller on many home systems! This is because your computer’s CPU can calculate parity many times faster than a low-cost RAID controller can.

      In my experience, RAID 5 is mostly good for redundancy (parity). Its theoretical performance advantages tend to be muted by communications issues such as bus saturation. That’s why I recommended RAID 0+1 — the performance increase is huge and instantly noticeable. The reason that RAID 0 is so much faster than RAID 5 is because each drive gets its own i/o bus (usually an SATA bus in home systems).

      The conventional “wisdom” for RAID 5 is that more drives = more performance. In practice, the opposite is true for most home users. Low-cost RAID controllers have the best chance of creating a high performance system with only three or four drives configured in RAID 5 — and that will happen only if your motherboard and/or controller card(s) have three or four available independent (non-shared) i/o channels (SATA channels).

      Since RAID 5 usually requires a RAID controller, and RAID 0+1 requires only four i/o channels, the cost-benefit ratio is superior for RAID 0+1 for the average home computer tinkerer. However, a RAID controller is easier to set up.

      Given the quality of modern disk drives, and the low cost of a large external drive, I would not be afraid to use RAID 0. Just make sure that you have a good backup strategy, because RAID 0 more than doubles the risk of losing your entire volume. But you really should back up anyway… and RAID 0 is “free” for many folks.

      I cover SSD elsewhere in this thread, but the short version is that SSDs help some things (SEEK) but are much slower than disk for other things (continuous throughput for READs and, especially, WRITEs). There is little point in investing in an SSD drive if you seek overall performance gains because you just will not get it. However, some specific applications benefit from SSDs, such as Windows. But that has more to do with Windows than it does with SSD drives. Note that I am suggesting installing Windows on the SSD with most programs and data on a hard drive.

      Note also that there is nothing special about SSD drives except for their i/o controller. The actual memory is the same as high performance flash memory. So a cheap flash drive installed with the proper strategy could produce most of the performance advantage of an SSD without the additional cost of the SSD’s controller hardware. The flash memory would be limited by the bandwidth of the USB bus but, for random access of many small files, the SEEK performance boost could be greater than the loss due to bus saturation. Also note that random access of many small files is the only circumstance under which either SSD or flash offers any performance advantage over hard drives.

      Microsoft’s ReadyBoost for Win7 and Vista is designed to take advantage of the high SEEK performance of flash memory without the expense of adding an SSD drive. ReadyBoost is not perfect for all applications, but it is the easiest and most cost-effective way to take advantage flash memory’s fast SEEK times without the expense of adding an SSD drive.

      ReadyBoost tips:

        [*:bwcep4sy]

      Keep Superfetch turned on.

      [*:bwcep4sy]Use high performance flash memory (usually mail-ordered rather than store-purchased — it is usually cheaper when mail-ordered, as well).

      [*:bwcep4sy]Format your flash drive(s) with exFAT (Win7) or NTFS (Vista). (You may have to enable write caching on the flash drive in order to format with NTFS. Note that enabling write caching means that you cannot unplug the flash drive without unmounting the drive first (Safely Remove Hardware).)

      [*:bwcep4sy]More flash = greater performance (up to 3x the size of your PC’s RAM). The ReadyBoost tab in the drive properties dialog only tells part of the story.

      RAIDing SSD drives helps the overall throughput limitations, but, as you say, the costs quickly exceed most people’s home budgets! 🙂

    • #62990

      Well I bought a 5870 1GB to upgrade my older gamerig. But doesn’t work with my AM2 mobo from MSI. Chipset init problem. Bios update didn’t work. Bought a mobo mem CPU set to make a major upgrade. Just want to be DX11 ready and play AVP in full fidelity.

      GA-890A-UD3H

      Phenom II 965 Black edition.

      8GB Dominator memory.

      And it works.

      And a new Windows 7 Home premium

      So 3Quater I might buy a GTX480 for Ci7 3D gamerig.

      Have also a third PS3 on the same monitor.

    • #62991
      Bullwinkle wrote:
      Thanks, Grimloon. I will add that my discussion with Shant was about adding performance to his existing computer on the cheap… which meant no additional hardware. In that case, Windows must be installed first, obviously.

      Ah right, sorry! Wrong end of stick firmly grasped and both feet inserted into gob (again! 😳 ) I usually forget that I look at these matters from an enterprise/enthusiast perspective.

      I tend to buy parts based on what they will still have available in however many years time e.g. P35 chipset with ICH9R controller so up to 6 channel SATA RAID is a given. Add a secondary dual channel SATA controller and I was sold! (GA-P35-DS3P) I also bought the Q6600 G0 on the same approach – I don’t need any more oomph now but I can OC the nuts off it if necessary. It’s more a case of “What will I have in 2 years time?” rather than “How big is my e-peen now?” The exception to the rule is video cards – 12 to 18 months @ ~£200 a pop.

      @SuperG – I very much doubt that you’re going to have to upgrade from a 5870 any time soon. I’m running a 5850 at 5,040 x 1,050 where supported (gotta love Eyefinity – X3 looks awesome!) and haven’t seen a slow down yet at max settings. AvP runs sweet as, you just have to remember to move the chair away from the desk a bit more as it’s a touch of overkill in surround unless you’re sat far enough back!

    • #62992

      I got 3 PC.

      HD2900XT -> 58701GB

      GTX285+8600GT -> GTX4?? ( +GTX285 ) PHYSX

      X1800XT

      And there monitors stand next to each other. The nV rig card can use the D-sub input off the other monitor. The 120hz samsung has just one input. So my 5870 just use one monitor.

      But first I wait and see what Fermi brings. Not in a hurry.

    • #62993
      SuperG wrote:
      I got 3 PC.

      I have a few more than that in various states of repair 🙂

      I no longer have my IBM 8086 XT but I still have a 486 DX2 80 running MSDOS 6.2 for older games – I think I bought it something like 16 years ago? That was the last pre built system I ever bought, self build from there onwards ‘cos warranties are for wimps! It has 2 12 MB Voodoo 2 cards in SLI as well as a 4MB VESA card – that was definitely the Mutt’s Nuts way back when 😀

    • #62994

      😳 I have 5 laptops at the moment. Loaned two, and two are in storage. When I’m really happy, I like to sit back and add the money it took to purchase all five. Brings me back down a notch…

      Oh.

      My super computer (for its time.) Was a Gateway FX, which I didn’t feel like taking to the desert, so I left it for the fam. Mistake. Currently I’m using a Macbook.

      CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo, 2.26 GHz

      Memory: 4 GB

      HDD: 250 GB

      Gfx Card: NVIDIA GeForce 9400M (PCI, 256MB VRAM)

      Snd Card: Intel High Definition Audio (??? No idea where to find on my mac. System Profiler is complicated.)

      Input/Joystick: ..Logitech mouse?

      Not the most powerful computer ever, but it certainly runs the three games I play on it. 🙂

    • #62995

      Potsmoke66
      Participant

      good to see not everybody has a supercomputer 😳

      OS: MS Windows XP SP3 (still!)

      CPU: Intel Core 2CPU @ 2,13 GHz

      MAINBD: Kentsfield?

      RAM: 2GB DDR

      RD: SATA 300int & 500ext GB, 2x PCI 250GB both, external USB 250GB, (Rigid Disk 😉 )

      DVD Rom / DVD -, writer

      GFX: NVIDIA GForce 7600GT PCIE

      SND: Creative SB Live! and a turned off internal, i dont trust soundcards without at least a few discreet components.

      Input: of course a keyboard (crappy MS) and a mouse (of course logitech), Logitech Dual Action, Logitech WingMan Cordless, Logitech WingMan Formula Force Pro (a Wheel), oh i forgot one MS Sidewinder and another simple Logitech digital Pad. am i a octopus ❓

      a scanner no two, one very old scsi, but hey res. is still as good as of the new only weight is 4x – full steel chassis, printer(s) and a JVC micro hi-fi attached to SB.

      and some flat HP 16/9 screen plus a old Sony 4/3, else i would sit in the dark 😆

      SATA might be fast yes, but the plugs they gave them make it to a cheap crap, it isn’t a proper connection! all this flat ass to ass connection, this is not electronic that’s rubbish. a plug has to have a propper place to sit in, like male / female and not two female, it won’t work! that’s no technology it’s cheap plastic crap. who ever is responsible for that, should return his title as engineer immidiatly!

      i mean a plug for a system relevant component that is cheaper as a USB connection? why they don’t use simple cables sticked in a hole that’s cheaper to. really that is no technology i hate it when i look at it. or even better glued on flat cables, i love them!

      sometimes i have a I/O error on my Internal SATA due to that!

      it might be fast but my system runs on trustable “slow” ATA with the good old heavy to plugin / plug out PCI connection

      due to that fact i can use SATA only for storing media

      there was once standarts for computer components and a good plug “cuts in” (even a USB does that) when connected, to grant it’s functionality, you have older non system relevant components with far better connectivity, like the std serial, additionally fixed with two screws. but for SATA they forgot all these standarts, they not even cut in and tend to corrode, so it’s a professionally weakened part you can say and failure is programmed.

      some additional RAM would fit i guess

      talkin’ about bottlenecks, processors the biggest of all

      isn’t the FSB more important anyway?

      and let’s talk about grandpa he’s gettin’ 60 soon. (x86 CPU)

      after all moving this large amount of data to a HD, only because of mem limit’s of grandpa, it’s no rel good solution, it works, but fails often. i repeat myself hm; one for mami one for daddy, one for gran… oh no…… shit start again one for mami, one for ahh damn’ again…. one for mami and so on

      we could revert to this that works good the same as

      z3.jpg

    • #62996

      It everybody free choice how much they want to spent on there equipment. But with that also set’s the limits the hardware can handle.

      It’s a choice a 8600GT was cheap wen it was brand new. And I could play Farcry2 on 1920×1200 on low settings and still look nice. But I like more luxory and it became a GTX285+ 8600GT.

      And now have a other rig with 5870. I already have played DX11 Games wich use some off those new Testalation feature.

      Play games on high settings. That a choice of freedom each PC gamer has. But a console not. Spects are fix so most settings to.

      A Game PC you can make as cheap as you want or very expensive. And still have fun gaming.

    • #62997
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      At the end of the year I will be spec’ing out another machine, the kids complaining they can’t play all the latest games. So now the slowest machine in the house will have a 8800GTS which is still a good card. My current rig will go to the wife which has a single 4890 and I have been thinking about going budget this time but also wanting to get DX11 as well and thought a card like this will be good…

      http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a … 6814125327 (will buy 2x of these)

      I know I have a few more months yet and I’m sure prices will drop so quality will rise. Was looking to spend around $300 total on the gfx. I wanted to try out crossfire to see if there is any real improvements.

    • #62998

      Anonymous

      [jk]I wand to stop this thread!!![/jk]

      Lol… I just feel bad reading this thread, on the one hand I’m glad you all have nice and shiny stacked boxes with the latest hardware, on the other hand… I’m crying in envy. I bought my PC five years ago, it was on the lower price range, onboard graphic (Radeo Xpress 200), 256 MB system ram (trust me, I feel cheated so I raided my brother’s PC and grabbed another piece of 256 MB DDR, his was four years older than mine.)

      What can I say, it was a $200 deal…

    • #62999

      CPU: Intel Core i7 930

      Memory: 4Gb of ddr3 ram

      HDD: OCZ Apex 120gb SSD

      Gfx Card: GTX 480 Superclocked 🙂

      Snd Card:Integrated High definition Audio.

      Input/Joystick: Standard cheap Mouse and Keyboard, don’t like the “New” mice with all these contours….

    • #63000

      Geraldine
      Participant

      My current spec is 🙄 ………… ferociously retro!

      They are, starting with my beloved Amiga 500+ with 1 meg RAM expansion and 1.3/2.04 ROM switcher, Amiga A1200 with 80 Meg HD, 68030 (with FPU) accelerator card and 8 Megs of fast ram, a CD32 totally standard except for 2 Competition Pro game pads and my A4000 with 24 Megs of fast ram, 3.1 Roms, a 4 Gig IDE card drive, an Indivision AGA card (for displaying native screen modes on modern monitors), a Cybervision card (for high res screen modes) and a Cyberstorm MkIII 68060.

      The 4000 though is presently away being repaired and I hope to get it back in fully working order soon. Dying to experience what OS 3.9 is like as it is the most advanced OS for classic Amigas. I also hope I can rescue some files from it’s old Hard Drive. I have a very advanced Frontier Commander on there!

      Oh and last and most definitely least a crap PC, as to it’s spec? Um,…………it works and its not an Amiga! 😡

    • #63001

      I’m on my mom’s school laptop, so it’s nothing special.

      It’s capable of modest gaming, though nothing worth drooling over.

      Current:

      CPU: 2.16ghz Celeron or Genuine Intel(R) CPU 585 @ 2.16GHz (DxDiag)

      Memory: 2gb

      HDD: 149gb

      Gfx Card: 1gb Mobile Intel(R) 4 Series Express Chipset Family (DxDiag)

      Snd Card SoundMAX HD Audio

      Input/Joystick: Small USB mouse + Integrated keyboard & Touch pad thing

    • #63002

      17 x desktop 2.4Ghz single core up to core 2 duo 2.4

      6 x laptops 1.4 – 1.6

      (I do a lot of multi client gaming.. as you might have guessed)

      Main rig:

      X1950XTX 512 – Core 2 Duo 2.4 – 3Gb Ram – Xp 32b – 3x 19″ LCD – Triple Head 2 Go – TrackiR – SBLive! 1024 (still alive ‘n’ kicking!)

      Controllers:

      Saitek Pro Flight yoke / rudder pedals / throttle quadrant (yeah, am a bit of a flight sim buff also)

      Logitek G25 racing wheel / pedals / gear stick

      Saitek X52 Flight control system / throttle advance – MFD

      Saitek Cyborg 3D Gold

      MS Sidewinder Force Feedback Pro (for those evenings when I like to arm wrestle the computer)

      MS Sidewinder Strategic Commander (never could figure out how to use that bloody thing)

      Saitek MegaGrip VIII (Jeez, I still HAVE that?)

      Internet:

      50Mb Cable primary with 8Mb DSL secondary

      Oh.. and my DL380 server with UPS but that is only for special occasions.

      Not to mention boxes of sound / graphics / ethernet cards / AT ATX PSUs

      HEY, PEOPLE.. if you NEED anything.. let me know.. I can probably send it to you for free!!

    • #63003

      Workstation:

      Code:
      CPU: 4x Opteron-8354
      Memory: 16GB (8x 2GB)
      HDD: 250GB
      Gfx Card: 9500GT
      Snd Card: Audigy
      Input/Joystick: Mouse/Keyboard
      Monitor: 2x SyncMaster 204B

      Server:

      Code:
      CPU: 2x Opteron 280
      Memory: 8GB (8x 1GB)
      HDD: 4x500GB
      Gfx Card: FX5500
      Snd Card: No sound
      Input/Joystick:
      Monitor:
    • #63004
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Got some nice rigs there Simbad. I wouldn’t mind a server myself to maybe host some games for SSC, but not sure on how much bandwidth that would suck up for my home connection because everyone uses the web here and lots of streaming tv 🙂

    • #63005

      Both machines are running a 64-Bit linux. On the workstation I have additionaly W2K and WinXP virtual machines. The W2K for playing Civ2 and the WinXP for my work and some of the development tools I use.

      The VMs are on nearly the same speed a real machine, as long as you do not run high end graphics applications.

    • #63006

      currently my PC is

      CPU: AMD Athlon 64, 3200+ 2GHz

      Memory: 1.5GB

      HDD: Several, 40gb for Windows XP SP3 Pro, 90gb originally for things like office, photoshop etc. and a 500gb for games but I accidently deleted everything on my 500gb before it became my for that use and now I have it sitting there doing nothing waiting to be recovered before I can use it.

      Gfx Card: Saphire X1350 256mb

      Snd Card: Onboard for Vent, SoundBlaster for game sounds

      Input/Joystick: Saitek AV8R (misplaced it currently)

      I plan on getting (when my insurance claim comes through)

      CPU: AMD Athlon X3 II 3GHz

      Memory: 2/4GB DDR3

      HDD: Sticking with my current HDD setup

      Gfx Card: ATI HD5750 1GB DDR5

      Snd Card: Sticking with the Sound Settup I currently have.

      Input/Joystick: Not bothered about changing it currently but I would love a full set up to use with FSX Accelerator

    • #63007

      CPU: AMD II X3 435 (2.9GHz)

      Memory: 4GB DDR3

      HDD: 500GB Sata 2

      Gfx Card: Geforce GTX 460

      Snd Card: Realtek HD audio (Integrated in Gigabyte GA-880GA-UD3H motherboard)

      Input/Joystick: mouse + keyboard 🙂

    • #63008

      You guys have some really great computers! Mine is kind of a dinosaur, but, well, you know. Money is tight.

      Code:
      CPU: Phenom X4 9600*
      Memory: 6 GB of DDR2
      HDD: 800 GB**
      Gfx Card: nVidia 8800 GT 512
      Snd Card: Realtek integrated crud
      Input/Joystick: Logitech Wingman Extreme, Mouse + Keyboard mostly

      *Yes, the Phenom with the TLB issues. Bypassing the fix boosts performance, but it’s a dog anyway.

      **Total from four older hard drives.

      I’m hoping to save up money for a new rig next summer, we’ll see how that pans out. Heh.

    • #63009

      RAM: 1.5 GB

      OS: Windows XP

    • #63010

      Aero
      Participant

      My computer is about five years old…

      Code:
      CPU: Intel 1.6 GHz
      Memory: 760 MBs
      HD: 90 GBs
      Video: Integrated Intel 915GM 128MB (T&L 2.0, no vertex & shader)

      (If my computer was present during Pioneer’s time, it would be a relic worth a fortune)

    • #63011

      Cpu: Intel c2d 3 ghz

      Mem: 2gb ddr2

      Hdd: 500gb + 160gb DL + 320gb ext + 1tb ext

      Gfx card: evga 8800gt ssc 512mb

      Snd card: integrated 7.1

      Input: basic logitech kb, M500 logitech mouse, logitech joystick wingman 3d

      Monitor: 19″ Neovo

      win7 – 3 years old config

      Laptop HP DV7

      Intel c2d 2.2gh

      4gb ddr3 ram

      2x 320gb disks

      4650 1gb mobile

      17″ display 1600*900

      M500 logitech mouse

      win7 – just got his 1st candle on the cake this christmas 🙂

    • #63012

      Desktop

      Cpu: Intel Pentium D 3.4Ghz Dual Core Proc

      Mem: 3gb DDR2 Ram

      Hdd: 2×250 gb SATA drives, one 500gb SATA drive

      Gfx card: EVGA 9800GTX+

      Snd card: Turtle Beach Riviera (onboard sound crapped out, i bought what was cheap, lol)

      Input: Moush, Zboard Merc Gaming Keyboard

      Monitor: Old PoS

      OS: Windows 7 32 bit

      Laptop

      Cpu: AMD Athalon X2 64 2.3Ghz Dual Core

      Mem: 3gb Ram

      Hdd: 320gb

      Gfx card: Nvidia 9000M G

      Snd card: Onboard HD Audio

      Monitor: 14 Inch

      OS: Windows Vista Home Premium 32bit

    • #63013

      Summary

      Operating System

      MS Windows 7 64-bit

      CPU Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 @ 3.00GHz

      RAM 8.0GB Dual-Channel DDR2 @ 400MHz

      MB ASUSTeK Computer INC. P5Q-PRO (LGA 775)

      Mon SyncMaster (1680×1050@60Hz)

      VGA ATI Radeon HD 4870 Series (Sapphire/PCPartner)

      HDD 488GB Hitachi Hitachi HDP725050GLA360 (SATA)

      35.9GB FUJITSU MAX3036NP SCSI Disk Device (SCSI)

      488GB ATA DriveXpert HDD0 SCSI Disk Device (RAID)

    • #63014

      CPU: Intel Dual Core 3.0Ghz

      Memory: 2GB DDR2 – Keep meaning to upgrade

      HDD: 1 x 1TB SATA, 1 x 350GB SATA, 1 x 80GB IDE

      Gfx Card: ATI RADEON HD 4550 512mb

      Snd Card: onboard =/

      Input/Joystick: Xbox 360

      OS: Slackware 13.1 / Windows 7 64bit

    • #63015
      Code:
      CPU: Intel 2.4GHz Core-2-Quad
      Memory: 8GB @800Mhz DDR2
      HDD: 1TB Western Digital w/ 64MB cache
      Gfx Card: 1GB DDR5 XFX Radeon HD5870
      Snd Card: Creative X-Fi Soundblaster Audigy w/ optical output
      Input/Joystick: XBox 360 wireless controller for Windows using Pinnacle Game Profiler for mapping

      Simbad wrote:
      Both machines are running a 64-Bit linux.

      That’s sweet! 😀

      I use Windows 7 x64 on the computer whose specs are listed above, but… I have a Mac that triple-boots with Windows, OSX, and Ubuntu 10.10 64-bit, plus I use Ubuntu Studio in my control room for my music work, and I have an Ubuntu 10.04 home media server. I even was running MythBuntu in my bedroom to DVR my TV shows, but I recently decided to switch back to Windows 7 Media Center because I was unable to figure out how to decode Hi-Def channels with my tuner. WMC does it “out-of-the-box”. It’s cool to see a fellow Linux user on here 🙂

    • #63016

      Got me a pair of Asus 23″ VH236H monitors… lovin em!

      DualDesktop1.jpg

    • #63017

      i7 920@3.6Ghz

      6GB DDR3 1866

      Intel G2 80GB HDD + 1TB F3 + 640GB WD + 250GB Seagate (all Sata)

      Ati (or AMD?) 5870

      Samsung 223BW

    • #63018

      OSH
      Participant

      Well…

      Athlon64 @2GHz

      2 GB RAM

      Radeon X1550 (but now I’m using integrated GF 6100, works better than Radeon)

      HDD 160 GB

      Thrustmaster 16000M

    • #63019

      farcodev
      Participant

      My upcoming new one for the week to come (i’ve already some parts of it):

      Phenom II 1100T + 16gb RAM + 2*60gb SSD + 1*1TB HD + 1*radeon 6970 + Nvidia 210 (for PhysX) + a mechanical Das Keyboard and a Haf-X tower case. For power all of this a 750w PSU

      Big update i’ve waited for 2 years, i’ll buy an another radeon + 24″ monitor for september/october :geek:

      My old Athlon X2 can take a retirement after 5 years of service :mrgreen:

    • #63020

      http://www.ebuyer.com/product/236587

      Processor : Intel Core i5-655K 3.2GHz Turbo Boost to 3.46GHz Intel® H57 Express Chipset

      Memory 6GB DDR3 RAM (more lol )

      Hard Drive: 1TB SATA (more later)

      Optical Drive: DVD Writer (blueray later)

      Operating System: Windows 7 Home Premium

      Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GTX460 1GB

      PC i might be getting maybe add more ram and second hard drive as well

      don’t know yet still looking hope to find out next week, what money i have to spend ???

    • #63021

      Hi DarkOne,

      this is my config:

      CPU: Intel Core i3-370M

      Memory: 4 GB

      HDD: 500 GB

      Gfx Card: ATI 550v

      Snd Card: Realtek

      Input/Joystick: USB Joystick

      OS: MS Win 7 Home Premium 64bit / Ubuntu 10.04

      I am sure I will not upgrade for next future, beside the fact it will be a bit hard with a laptop :D. In fact I upgraded last year form a single core machine 8 years old. My goal was to get a new computer good enough for working and gaming, and I think I found the best compromise for the acceptable price I wanted to pay.

      Greetings

      SpaceRider

    • #63022

      Hi all,

      my profile looks like that:

      Prozessor: Intel Core i7 Extreme 980X

      Codename: Gulftown

      Architekt.: 1 CPU – 6 Kerne – 12 Threads

      Revision: B1

      Tech.: 0.0320 µ

      F.M.S.: 6.C.2 – Ext. 6.2C

      Instruct.: MMX SSE (1 2 3 3S 4.1 4.2) EM64T VT-x AES

      Socket: Socket 1366 LGA

      CPU-Takt: 1606.87 MHz

      Multiplik.: x12.00

      FSB: 133.91 MHz

      L1 Cache: Data: 6 x 32 / Inst: 6 x 32 KBytes

      L2 Cache: 6 x 256 KBytes

      L3 Cache: 12288 KBytes

      Temperatur:

      CPU-Z Vers.: 1.56

      MainBoard: Rampage II Extreme

      Northbridge: Intel X58 rev 13

      Southbridge: Intel 82801JR (ICH10R) rev 00

      RAM: 2048 MB Corsair (10700)

      2048 MB Corsair (10700)

      2048 MB Corsair (10700)

      Size: 6144 MB

      Typ: DDR3-SDRAM

      Timing: 9.0-9-9-24

      RAM-Takt: 669.5 MHz

      Ratio: 2:10

      Grafikkarte: ASUS ARES

      Subvendor: ASUS

      Chipsatz: Cypress

      Tech.: 40 nm

      RAM: 2048 MB GDDR5

      RAM-Takt: 1200 MHz (1200 MHz)

      Width: 256 bit

      Bandwith: 153.6 GB/s

      Core-Takt: 850 MHz (850 MHz)

      Shaders: 1600 (DX 11.0)

      Fillrate: 27.2 GPixel/s | 68.0 GTexel/s

      Bus: PCI-E 2.0 x16 @ x16 2.0

      Treiber, Ver.: 8.791.0.0 (Catalyst 10.11) / Win7 64

      GPU-Z Vers.: GPU-Z 0.5.1

      Sound:

      GehäuseTyp: Big Tower

      Marke: Thermaltake

      Netzteil: Silent Pro Gold

      Leistung: 1200 W

      Monitor: ACER P244W

      max. Aufl.: 1920 x 1080

      Bildfläche: 525 x 296

    • #63023
      Geraldine wrote:
      My current spec is 🙄 ………… ferociously retro!

      They are, starting with my beloved Amiga 500+ with 1 meg RAM expansion and 1.3/2.04 ROM switcher, Amiga A1200 with 80 Meg HD, 68030 (with FPU) accelerator card and 8 Megs of fast ram, a CD32 totally standard except for 2 Competition Pro game pads and my A4000 with 24 Megs of fast ram, 3.1 Roms, a 4 Gig IDE card drive, an Indivision AGA card (for displaying native screen modes on modern monitors), a Cybervision card (for high res screen modes) and a Cyberstorm MkIII 68060.

      The 4000 though is presently away being repaired and I hope to get it back in fully working order soon. Dying to experience what OS 3.9 is like as it is the most advanced OS for classic Amigas. I also hope I can rescue some files from it’s old Hard Drive. I have a very advanced Frontier Commander on there!

      Oh and last and most definitely least a crap PC, as to it’s spec? Um,…………it works and its not an Amiga! 😡

      Please, stop talking of Amiga, you make me cr. I will never forgive myself of having given away that Jewel of an Amiga, which was my proudness! 😡

    • #63024
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator
      tianhe1 wrote:
      Please, stop talking of Amiga, you make me cr. I will never forgive myself of having given away that Jewel of an Amiga, which was my proudness!

      Your not in the boat alone, I gave my Amiga 500 away for free a few years ago and what a software library I had for that thing 🙂

    • #63025

      Pinback
      Participant

      You can always get the Amiga emulator UAE, lots of ADFs of the games around for it nowdays.

    • #63026

      This is my current system specs. But, I will be upgrading my system soon…

      CPU: Intel Core i7 Processor i7-860 (2.86GHz) 8MB Cache SKT -1156

      Memory (RAM): 12GB RAM (DDR3)

      Motherboard: ASUS P7P55D PRO: DDR3, S-ATA II, 3 x PCI-Ex, 2 x PCI

      Operating System: Genuine Windows 7 Professional (64-Bit)

      1st Hard Disk (OS System + Application)

      WESTERN DIGITAL CAVIAR 500GB SATA2 32MB (7200rpm)

      2st Hard Disk (OS System + Application)

      WESTERN DIGITAL CAVIAR 500GB SATA2 16MB (7200rpm)

      3nd Hard Disk (Application, Games + Backup)

      Hitachi Deskstar 500GB SATA2 16MB (7,200rpm)

      1st GPU Card – Sapphire HD Ati 5870 (1GB)

      2nd GPU Card – XFX HD Ati 5870 (1GB)

      Crossfire Enabled: Yes

      Sound Card: ASUS XONAR DS PCI 7.1 (GX25 Audio Engine)

      Case: Antec Twelve Hundred Series

      Power Supply & CPU Heatsink: Antec 1000W + Antec Kuhler Box (Heatsink)

    • #63027

      Geraldine
      Participant
      "tianhe1" wrote:
      Please, stop talking of Amiga, you make me cr. I will never forgive myself of having given away that Jewel of an Amiga, which was my proudness! <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_mad.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:x’ />

      Dear oh dear, as bad a case of retr0 fever I have seen in a long time! What you need to do is get yourself to Amibay, lots of miggys (and other retr0 goodness) for sale there, and yes Pinback is correct you can always try UAE or Amiga Forever, heck, if you have retr0 fever that bad, you could also go for C64 Forever too <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//wink3.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’;)’ /> However (as I might hazard a guess Pinback might agree with me here), emulators are all well and good, but for the proper experience, using the actual machine itself is best. <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_e_smile.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:)’ />

      Anyways, here is a fun video, 8 Bit Starcraft! <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_lol.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:lol:’ />

      [media][media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8B16eAS1dwA&feature[/media[/media]]

    • #63028

      Pinback
      Participant

      It’s always nice to have the original hardware and emulators are good for trying out all these games you never played.

      Starcraft on a C64. 😎

    • #63029

      Recently replaced my.

      22” samsung 3D monitor for a Acer 3D monitor HN274H 27″

      PS3 and PC and BR 3D play on it.

      And GTX285 + 8600GT replaced by Zotac GTX580 AMp2 3GB. It took 3slots away

      The Gianward 560TI 2GB did’t fit on the Mobo. need 2slots

      Maybe a custum cooler refit?

      My other system with sata600 get a SSD 120GB intel 510 Sata600. As OS drive.

    • #63030

      CPU: Intel Core2Duo @2.4Ghz

      Memory: 3Gb DDR2

      HDD: 162Gb + 60Gb

      Gfx Card: Intel GM965

      Snd Card: Realtek High Definition Audio

      Input/Joystick: Default Keyboard and Mouse / Thrustmaster T-Flight Stick X

      Yes, it’s a laptop, and a slow one too. But enough for most games I play. 😀

      Anyhow, I do plan on getting a proper desktop, but money’s a problem. 😥

    • #63031
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Don’t fret LynxIndigo

      You can play most games space themed games out there with that rig, most. There is a new in development that might tax that system but the 3GB of memory helps.

    • #63032

      Geraldine
      Participant

      Well, one advantage to the lack of new development within the space sim genre is that all the older games will run (mostly) fine on modest modern setups.

      Anyways. Time for more retr0 madness! <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_redface.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:oops:’ /> tianhe1 isn't going to like this next bit very much. I thought I would update my system specs.

      The miggys have all (with the exception of the CD32) been upgraded since my last post about them and best news of all the big A4000 is back! Yaaay! <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_e_biggrin.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:D’ />

      A500+: 68010 CPU (repaired my myself I am pleased to say), A590 with a 4 GIG SCSI Hard Drive with an extra 2 megs of RAM, 1.3/2.04 ROM Switcher cleaned up and more neatly mounted inside the case with a "new" retro styled switch. Rubbish standard battery ripped out and new coin battery soldered on to the motherboard in it's place and a A570 CDTV CD-ROM drive

      A1200 Desktop 1: 68030@40 MHz accelerator board now with 16 megs of RAM, Workbench 3.9, 3.1 ROMs and a 4 GIG CF Drive with <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_redface.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:oops:’ /> …….2500 (give or take) Amiga games installed and a Pioneer Slot loading SCSI CD-ROM running via a squirrel PCMCIA interface.

      A1200 Desktop 2: 68040@25 MHz accelerator board also with 16 megs of RAM, Workbench 3.0, 3.0 ROMs and also another 4 GIG CF drive filled again with games and an IDE DvD ROM burner via PCMCIA.

      A4000 Desktop: 68060@60 MHz Cyberstorm MkIII with 100 megs of RAM and new heatsink and illuminated (blue) fan, OS 3.9, 3.1 ROMs, Cybervision PPC (with new heatsinks and micro sized fan for the graphics chip) with (now fixed) Indivision AGA card, another Pioneer Slot Loading SCSI CD-ROM, a 70 GIG SCSI hard drive, 2 floppy drives, 4 GIG CF drive filled to the brim and motherboard fully refurbished with new caps and clock circuits repaired with new non leaking battery.

      So that's my miggys sorted for a while then <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_e_smile.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:)’ />

      What else, um….2 X Box 1s, one modded with various emulators installed on a 60 GIG hard drive and the other bog standard. Both of these have a mouse adaptor. A PS1 that I got for nothing and striped and cleaned it up. Only bit of hardware I bought for it was a dual shock controller and thanks to all that gave me good suggestions for PS1 space sims <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//wink3.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’;)’ />

      Finally a Falcon mobo based (I think) X Box 360 with a 250 GIG hard drive with a mouse and PS1/2 controller adaptor.

      I really must get out more <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_redface.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:oops:’ />

    • #63033

      Pinback
      Participant

      Nice collection of Amiga Geraldine 😀 but will you ever fill that 70 gig hard drive

    • #63034
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      I would collect older computers but my problem is space and kids. You look like you have put some time and money into that collection and glad to hear that they are all operational. Can you find replacement parts fairly cheap for Amiga’s still?

    • #63035

      Geraldine
      Participant
      "PINBACK" wrote:
      but will you ever fill that 70 gig hard drive

      <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_lol.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:lol:’ /> I will do my best Pinback! But you also have a nice miggy setup too dont you?

      As for bits, some things can be difficult to source, high end accelerator cards especially as these can go for silly money these days. But with patience and constant trawling of Fleabay and Amibay, can reap you rewards. Basic setups are still fairly easy to get and are reasonably priced too. It's just the exotic parts, Blizzard cards, Zorro cards and the like that can be a nightmare to track down.

      Oh and Darkone, if you see a nice Amiga 600 going cheap in the states, snap it up right away. They go for a small fortune over there because they are so rare. Likewise if you see a A3500T. This is the most rare and expensive standard miggy you could have. A saw one for sale once for £4000!! <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_eek.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:shock:’ /> Admittedly that was a crazy price but you would still be paying mega bucks.

      Finally there is the custom build machines. I have seen a 060/PPC powered Amiga 500 RTG Tower system, a PPC powered A1200 in a A600 case and lots of other amazing builds with home made parts. With these pricewise, the sky is the limit. There are alot of very talented builders out there. One guy I know of takes lowly Apollo 040 accelerator cards (must have Mach 131 chips on it) and turns them into 060 powered beasts running at 80 MHz! Doesn't sound much in these days of superfast Intel chips and the like, but for a miggy this is an incredible speed boost. Also with the PPC hardware, speeds are being pushed ever nearer the 400 MHz mark! Imagine a 20 year old machine running with a fully optimised OS at this speed. <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_eek.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:shock:’ />

      Ah, what could have been if computing history had gone a little differently <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_rolleyes.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:roll:’ />

    • #63036

      Pinback
      Participant

      My retro specs are 😆

      1 A500

      2 A1200

      2 Xbox

      1 gamecube

      1 N64

      1 PS1

    • #63037

      Geraldine
      Participant

      Nice! <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//wink3.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’;)’ />

    • #63038

      CPU: I7 – 2600, 3.4ghz

      Memory: 8gb, DDR3, 1333

      HDD: many … some in RAID 0 …… oh’ and a SDD for C:

      Gfx Card: 5970 for primary (eyefinity @ 120hz) … 8800GT for Physx

      Snd Card: xfi

      Input/Joystick: Saitek EVO Force + CH throttle

      Also …

      1 x ANOTHER MEGA GAMES RIG BUT NOT QUITE AS GOOD, AS IN EX MACHINE FOR MY SON 🙂

      1 x Dell X1 (Ubuntu 11.4)

      1 x Macbook (aka .. the pretty little refrigerator … i.e … just works, but nothing special)

      1 x A500 (Fat Angus, signed case)

      1 x C64

      1 x Vic20

      1 X PS3

      1 X PS2

      1 x X360

      1 X Xbox

      1 X Wii

      1 X operational PET :-))))))))))))

      And an AVR emulator for my Uni assembler stuff.

    • #63039

      Geraldine
      Participant

      Lovely retro selection you have there Badman. A signed A500! <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_cool.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’8-)’ /> Is your C64 an early "bread bin" model or one of the later ones?

    • #63040

      Bread bin, with a working cassette drive (although the head is rusty as hell … my fault, I live by the sea) and the 1541 floppy 🙂 …

      The only thing that fails on the old Commodores are the power supplies, so I’ve got jimm’ied up AT PC power supplies as stand in’s.

      I had an A2000 as well, but it accidentally got thrown out with a big system purge that I did about 8 years ago ….. I have a computer business and I had heaps of old Systems lying around for spares that were no longer relevant ….. and SOMEHOW the A2000 got ditched. Heart broken.

      Got a Dick Smith System 80 (Australian) floating around as well … Z80, but it’s dead 🙁 … not just CAP dead, IC dead.

    • #63041

      CPU: AMD AM3 Athlon 635 2,9 Ghz with 4 cores on MSI 870 Board

      Memory: GoodRam 4 GB (2×2 GB)

      HDD: Samsung Disk 80 GB

      Gfx Card: nVidia GT 220

      Snd Card: SB Audigy

      Input/Joystick: USB Apollo Pad

      Monitor: 22′ Technika LCD TV

      ModeCom Feel III 400W Power Supply

      Sorry about lack of information, but I have check my pc when the some parts i’ve bought on December 2010.

    • #63042

      Geraldine
      Participant
      "Badman" wrote:
      Bread bin, with a working cassette drive (although the head is rusty as hell … my fault, I live by the sea) and the 1541 floppy <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_e_smile.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:)’ /> …

      <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_cool.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’8-)’ /> The bread bin was the nicest looking of the C64s, although you should open it up and check for corrosion just to be safe <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//wink3.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’;)’ />

      "Badman" wrote:
      SOMEHOW the A2000 got ditched. Heart broken.

      Oh dear <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//sad.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:(‘ /> I hope it was seen and rescued by someone before being destroyed. The A2000 has the reputation of being the toughest miggy there is, it's been said on quite a few forums that in the event of a nuclear war, the only thing left will be ants and Amiga 2000s <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_e_smile.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:)’ />

      "Badman" wrote:
      Got a Dick Smith System 80 (Australian) floating around as well … Z80, but it's dead <img src='http://spacesimcentral.com/forum/public/style_emoticons//icon_e_sad.gif&#8217; class=’bbc_emoticon’ alt=’:sad:’ /> … not just CAP dead, IC dead.

      Mmmmm, not herd of these machines, a TRS-80 a-like? You might want to take a look at this site that sells old ICs http://www.buyicnow.com/

      Also, you might want to drop by Amibay as there is a lot of helpful people there who might be able to advise you. Here is a link http://www.amibay.com/

    • #63043

      Pinback
      Participant

      I finally at long last decided to get a new computer, should pick it next weekend.

      Then I will have to spend a month of Sundays trying to get all my old games to work. 😆

    • #63044

      CPU: Intel i7-2600K (3,4 GHz)

      Memory: 8 GB DDR3 RAM

      HDD: 2*128 GB SSD (one for system the other for recent games) and 2*500 GB IDE for old games and misc

      Gfx Card: ATI 6870 (planning to upgrade around christmas 2012)

      Snd Card: SB X-FI Xtreme

      Input/Joystick: Logitech mouse & keyboard

      Monitor: 27" Samsung (bought it for X³ & Evochron, rarely played them) =(

      OS: Win7 64bit (XCOM won't run on XP) =(

    • #63045

      CPU: Intel i7-920i (4Ghz)

      Memory: 6 GB DDR3 RAM

      Storage: 74GB intel SSD + Seagate 250 GB + WD 640 GB + Samsung F1 1TB

      Gfx: HD5870

      Mobo: Asus P6T SE

      Onboard audio

      Input: Razor Mamba + Logitech 510 keyboard; Logitech Joystick

      Monitor: Samsung 23″ TFT (about 6yo… waiting for a decent monitor to upgrade to)

      Case: Coolermaster Stacker original (this as a 10 year old big case) with watercooling setup.

       

      For the first time I’ve had a system that has lasted me 3 years untouched (well, except for the keyboard, that is newer). Actually, I think that I’d never been more than a year without replacing something. A sign of geting old maybe. Anyway, expect to change everything for a Haswell + HD8970/8950/whatever hasa decent bang for the buck, in mid 2013. And, finally, a new monitor.

    • #63046

      my baby…….rog 75 

      17.3″ FHD LED backlight EWV, anti glare

      Intel® Coreâ„¢ i7 Processor 3610QM speed: 2.3 GHz,Turbo boost  3.3Ghz FSB: 1333MHz,

      nVidia GeForce GTX 670M (N13E-GS1-LP) WITH 3GB DDR5

      8GB (4GB + 4GB) DDR3 1600 MHz SDRAM, 4 x SODIMM socket max 32GB SDRAM

      Hard disk 1   256GB SSD

      Hard disk 2  750GB

      RAZER MAMBA  super mouse

      logitech joystick F710

      and soon …….RAZER NOSTROMO

    • #63047

      Anonymous

      i got myself a upgrade last year

       

      balldozer FX 8120 cooled with a coolermaster V8

      Saphire pureblack 990 FX

      palit 260 gtx sonic

      2 hdd’s 1TB/160GB

      Novatech powerstation Black edition 750W

      Zalman Z11 Plus case

       

      Acer 21″p223W

      Cyborg keybored V7

      R.A.T 7

      Logitech speakers 5.1 X540

      Buffalo linkstaion 2TB

    • #63048
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Nice Dustdragon, you went with the 8-core AMD chip, how do you like it because I have been thinking about getting the FX8350? How much memory you got on there btw? I was thinking about getting at least 16GB.

    • #63049

      Shadowma45
      Participant

      amd athlon ™ IIx4 640 processor 3.00 ghz

      4gb installed as well as addtl 674 gb

      64 bit operating  system

      ge force gtx 760

      thinking about upgrading to titan & processor to support it in

      anticipation of star citizen.

    • #63050

      CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3330 CPU @ 3.00GHz (4 CPUs), ~3.0GHz

      Memory: 4096MB RAM

      HDD: Drive: C: 927.4 GB, Drive: E: 1701.9 GB

      Gfx Card:Intel(R) HD Graphics

      Snd Card:

      Input/Joystick:

      I’m really not good with all this graphics info and such.

      I ran the dxdiag to try to answer these but I have no clue what I’m reading.

       

      I do know that I was playing Entropia Universe a few months back and when someone I was chatting with commented that the grass looks so realistic, I knew looking down at a green carpet it was time to upgrade the Best-Buy special.

       

      I brought the medium setting requirements with me to Micro-Center and just handed the paper to a salesman and told him I needed to run this game

      Is there someone here who would help me translate what I have and suggest things for me?

      I know certain motherboards can only handle certain cards, but I have no clue what all this means.

      I could inbox u the dxdiag instead of filling this thread with it.

       

      And please, don’t go easy on me… you can’t hurt my feelings if I already know my rig is garbage.

      I wanna build a frankenstein!

       

      Believe it or not, my major in college was computer science.

      I did ace ‘BASIC’ and can draw a bad ass flow-chart thankuverymuch! lol

    • #63051

      CPU: Core i7 4930K 3.4 ghz
      Memory: 32 Gb of Crucial Ballistix Tracer
      HDD: 1tb Velociraptor [yeah thats right no SSD Yet]

      Gfx Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Superclocked w/ACX
      Snd Card:SB Zx
      Input/Joystick: Logitek G15 – Logiteck G27 –  Saitek X52 Pro

       


       

      1200 w PSU

      Cooler Master HAF 932

      Addonics S5A – 5 drive back plane

       

      [sharp eyes might notice in the one photo, that is a Radeon HD 4850 X2 in the Computer – I used this as ‘place holder’ the GTX 780 is in my old box right now]

       

      da230bb2-42b8-4335-bdcc-5df005b695f5_zps

       

      IMG_2486_zpsd441a233.jpg

       

      IMG_2439_zps43a36664.jpg

       

       

       

       

      Old PC I built in 2008

      – [the LAN Ports die 6 months ago the Video card Died on Black Friday  :haha:  poor me I had to buy a GTX 780]

       

      CPU:Core 2 Quad

      Memory: 6 Gb of Crucial Ballistix

      HDD: 500 gb Mirrored 1 tb Storage Drive – this has balloned to 2-2Tb, 1-1Tb, 1-750 gb. 1-500 gb

      Gfx Card: BFG GeForce GTX 280

      Snd Card: Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Professional

      Input/Joystick: Saitek X52 Pro

       

       

      Server I: Dell Power Edge 2900 III

       

      CPU: 2 x Xeon Dual Core 1.8 Ghz

      Memory: 24 Gb

      HDD: 500 gb boot drive – 3 Tb Raid 5 [6 500 gb hard drives]

       

      [torrent box]

       

      Server II: DL 360 G5

       

      CPU: 2x Xeon 3.4 Ghz  Dual Core

      Memory: 32 Gb

      HDD: 8 x 300 Gb 10000 rpm

       

      this is my VMWare Host

    • #63052

      And please, don’t go easy on me… you can’t hurt my feelings if I already know my rig is garbage.

      I wanna build a frankenstein!

       

      Believe it or not, my major in college was computer science.

       

       

       

       

       

       

      I am an Avid Reader of Maximum PC

       …. PC games to a lesser extent for hardware reviews 

       

       

      http://www.maximumpc.com/build_pc_recommended_builds_december_2013

    • #63053

      Have a minor upgrade.

       

      BL3200PT 32″ BenQ.

      MSI X290X Lightning

       

      And UPS to put my MS2012 R2E in action

      And PS4

    • #63054

      Anonymous

      Build this pc one year ago, i only used my hold graphic card but i want to upgrade it in the near future:

       

      CPU: i7 4770k

      MB: Asrock Z3 extreme

      8 giga ram DDR3 dual channel

      Radeon HD 6850

      Windows 7 64 bit

       

      Next upgrade is the videocard but i don’t know what kind of model…i’m unsure if to buy a new AMD or a Nvidia. Nvidia is better because of physics support, in same games physics is so complex that even a i7 processor can’t run it smoothly. AMD is a bit cheaper and i think it will become the reference in graphics card for gaming because also Xbox one and PS 4 are completely AMD maden.

      Nvidia loosed a big piece of market.

    • #63055
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      I would probably hold off on a gfx card purchase (I am) until the R380-390x cards come out from AMD, this should make Intel drop the price on the GTX970-980 cards. And it will be interesting to see the pricepoint, because AMD has been getting beat up by the GTX lately and they need to hopefully hit the market with something good. I haven’t owned a Intel gfx card in over 10yrs and I am about to purchase one if I don’t see something good from AMD soon. Because that GTX980 is a nice card.

       

      So who is gonna get my $$$ AMD or Intel? 🙂  Someone will because I need something good to play Star Citizen at Max settings 🙂

    • #63056
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      <chuckles> I’d not recommend intel gfx, D1 – you mean nVidia. I have an EVGA GTX 770 ACX SC 2GB with which I am very pleased. It’s old kit now, of course – but I grabbed it on special offer for only £200 last summer, which was a bargain. It runs Elite: Dangerous at a rock-steady 75fps on Ultra settings without breaking sweat – even in stations! Sweet!

       

      i5 4670K 4@3.4 + Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo

      EVGA GTX 770 ACX SC 2GB DDR5

      Corsair RM 750W Gold

      Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB DDR3 1600 RAM (2×8)

      Fractal Design Arc Midi

       

      That system, self-built last autumn, will have to last me for a few years – it broke the bank!

    • #63057

      Potsmoke66
      Participant

      SCREWBAG1

       

      cpc1610_zpsa8f76309.jpg

       

       

      a phantastic CP-1610 16bit maaaaachine from General Instruments

      it uses a 10bit opcode, the left 6bits are for future expansions

      it runs @ 894 kHz

      and uses 1456 bytes RAM

      the resolution is 159 x 96

      it displays 16 colors @ once

       

      SIMPLY HOT!

       

      but i’m thinking about if i shouldn’t replace it with a MC68000, it’s far better.

       

       

      OK, let’s get serious

      it’s nothing one could be proud of

       

      a poor mans computer

       

      Brand:          MEDION

      Model:          MS-7800

      Name:           STSORLCF49 (still that same old rotten lathe controller from 49)

      Processor:    AMD A8-5500 APU, 3200 MHz, 2 Kernels, 4 logical Processors with built in Radeon(tm) HD Graphics (disabled)

      RAM:            4GB

      GFX:             NVIDIA GeForce GT 440, 1GB RAM

      Snd:              built in Realtek Low Definition Audio, 7.1 wishi-washi

      HD:               1TB, brand “cook-a-mongo”

      Monitor:        Pops old HP

       

       

      however it does it’s job and i can’t afford any better

       

      [attachment=2956:01010082.JPG]

       

      in principles one could say the above CP-1610 is better, because the design of the chip is younger

       

       

       

      if i had the right money i would get me this one here:

       

      [attachment=2957:IMG_1043.jpg]

       

      capabilities: runs “Tennis for Two” (nothing else)

       

       

       

      who let the smoke out? In case you didn’t know, all electronic devices operate using smoke. You can prove this quite simply – if you let the smoke out of any electronic device, there is an incredibly high likelihood that it will no longer work. If it does still work, then there is still enough smoke left in it for it to continue operating.

    • #63058

      Potsmoke66
      Participant

       

      Believe it or not, my major in college was computer science.

      I did ace ‘BASIC’ and can draw a bad ass flow-chart thankuverymuch! lol

       

      Yeah see REAL CRACKS and other weirdos…

    • #63059

      Anonymous

      I would probably hold off on a gfx card purchase (I am) until the R380-390x cards come out from AMD, this should make Intel drop the price on the GTX970-980 cards. And it will be interesting to see the pricepoint, because AMD has been getting beat up by the GTX lately and they need to hopefully hit the market with something good. I haven’t owned a Intel gfx card in over 10yrs and I am about to purchase one if I don’t see something good from AMD soon. Because that GTX980 is a nice card.

       

      So who is gonna get my $$$ AMD or Intel? 🙂  Someone will because I need something good to play Star Citizen at Max settings 🙂

       

      GTX cards are Nvidia not intel. Actually intel produces only motherboard integrated vga.

      About the next vga i also decided to wait for AMD 300 series. R9 290 it’s a monster, 5 teraflop of floating point power against 3 teraflop of nvidia gtx 970. Anyway i read benchmarks on many sites where nvidia is superior. It’s very strange because of the power difference.

       

      http://gpuboss.com/gpus/Radeon-R9-290-vs-GeForce-GTX-970

       

      http://www.trustedreviews.com/opinions/nvidia-geforce-gtx-970-v-amd-radeon-r9-290_Page-2

       

      Nvidia it’s dx 12 compatible and AMD R290 11.2

       

      So i think it’s better to wait for the new AMD series because it has no sense to buy a new card with old direct x libraries.

    • #63060

      Anonymous

      hal9kplaysd3linux_by_theantibob-d9c63ke.

      hal9k

       

      this is the best pc i have

       

      it’s been thrown away, salvaged (by me) and reincarnated!

      i’ve had it for about 8 years, but the mobo is from 2004

      kinda had to stop all salvage operations once i got married… will it ever be replaced?

       

      athlon 64 (single core 2.4g but will eventually be a dual core if i can ever find a 939 – fingers crossed)

      1.5gb ddr2 ram

      ~6tb of total hdd(s)

      nvidia 8600gt (a little overclocked for better synchronization)

      1080p 60hz philips

      x52 HOTAS

      thrustmaster rudder control system (serial+midi/game port)

      little webcam for headtracking (linuxtrack)

       

      does pretty good for what it is, plays fullHD video just fine, flightgear (with headtracking eating up some cpu) in 1080p at about 25-35fps (rural scenes only, but i live in alaska so that’s fine by me)

      vendetta online maxed graphics (opengl, dot directx) 1080p & 4xaa at a solid 60 fps (except when my roidscanning scripts are running, that’s a slideshow)

       

      i think a raspberry pi would be a bit more powerful…

       

      this post is for pittyLaughs and to make everyone else out there feel a bit better about theirs

    • #63061

      Just bought 6700k+FuryX machine. i’ve been saving for 3 months, but it totally worth it. 

      ps. yeah, i’m in a red team)

    • #63062

      Anonymous

      When will be released next Nvidia and AMD cards?

    • #63063

      Anonymous

      I’m going to change my graphic card for next month but i’m not able to decide if to buy a radeon rx480 or a gtx 1060.

      Actually rx480 runs better on dx 12 and vulkan api but i think nvidia will fix this and nvidia has physx support.

      I read also that nvidia doesn’t support old vga improving drivers performance, they improve drive performance only for recent vga instead of AMD. So, if this is true, AMD cards work better in years instead of nvidia.

      What’s your opinion?

    • #63064

      auryx
      Participant

      I’ve used nVidia for years. I had a bad experience with some ATI cards many moons ago, and so don’t touch them with a barge pole! I’ve always found nVidia to offer better general compatibility with games.

       

      The only downside is their stupid lack of open-source drivers for Linux, forcing you to rely on flaky Nouveau or else making you need to update the driver with every new kernel. The lack of a decent framebuffer driver is also tedious. But I’m in Windows more than Linux, so I can live with this.

       

      auryx

    • #63065

      The only downside is their stupid lack of open-source drivers for Linux, forcing you to rely on flaky Nouveau or else making you need to update the driver with every new kernel.

      I’m confused.  Why won’t you use the proprietary drivers?  I’m generally in favor of open source everything by default as well, but we are talking a piece of hardware here, it certainly seems acceptable to me to use proprietary drivers created by the manufacturer of the hardware.  It’s been a while, but it’s my understanding that nVidia has impeccable Linux driver support, in no small part because they have been pushing the use of their GPU’s for scientific purposes for years (they certainly had terrific driver support the last time I had a graphics card on one of my Linux machines).  I’m looking forward to doing dual-boot on my main gaming machine, but I’m sort of in limbo over exactly what to do with the SSD’s.

    • #63066

      Anonymous

       

      I had a bad experience with some ATI cards many moons ago, and so don’t touch them with a barge pole!

       

       

      What appened?

    • #63067

      Anonymous

      CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300
      Memory: DDR2 8GB 400MHz
      HDD: 250GB
      Gfx Card: Nvidia GeForce GTS 250
      Snd Card: Integrated (look below)
      Motherboard: Gigabyte EP45-DS5
      Input/Joystick: A4Tech LCD-720 keyboard and Modecom MC-WM8 mouse

      KEK  :king:
       
      Edit (2016-09-11): I have just ordered new parts. Nothing much, but should work a little bit better. And the motherboard won’t be damaged (yep, this one isn’t working properly).

      Edit (2016-09-13): Actually the parts I got were worse than this, so I’m staying with my current setup, kek.

    • #63068
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300
      Memory: DDR2 8GB 400MHz
      HDD: 250GB
      Gfx Card: Nvidia GeForce GTS 250
      Snd Card: Integrated (look below)
      Motherboard: Gigabyte EP45-DS5
      Input/Joystick: A4Tech LCD-720 keyboard and Modecom MC-WM8 mouse

      KEK  :king:

       

      Edit (2016-09-11): I have just ordered new parts. Nothing much, but should work a little bit better. And the motherboard won’t be damaged (yep, this one isn’t working properly).

       

      And I thought I needed to upgrade my PC…. you desperately need a upgrade Aki 🙂 I can still play most games, I just cant turn on all the visuals in some newer games. But I want to build a rig to play everything with max settings so I will probably wait until the Zen processor comes out and build something on that platform. So starting to save now, maybe by next Christmas I will post my new dream rig specs. But right now I cannot play Star Citizen at all its unplayable even in the hanger for me.

    • #63069

      auryx
      Participant

      I’m confused.  Why won’t you use the proprietary drivers?  I’m generally in favor of open source everything by default as well, but we are talking a piece of hardware here, it certainly seems acceptable to me to use proprietary drivers created by the manufacturer of the hardware.  It’s been a while, but it’s my understanding that nVidia has impeccable Linux driver support, in no small part because they have been pushing the use of their GPU’s for scientific purposes for years (they certainly had terrific driver support the last time I had a graphics card on one of my Linux machines).  I’m looking forward to doing dual-boot on my main gaming machine, but I’m sort of in limbo over exactly what to do with the SSD’s.

       

      It’s by no means a big problem, and yes I do use the proprietary drivers – but they come with the two headaches I’ve mentioned. The first is that they don’t make a decent console-mode driver, so you’re stuck with big blocky text unless you’re in XWindows – which is just an aesthetic gripe really. The second annoyance (which you’ve probably experienced) is the hassle of having to explicitly blacklist the nouveau drivers to make the proprietary one work every time you install a new OS, and also having to make sure that your driver is re-deployed every time you have a kernel update. Not major nuisances, but enough that I’d prefer nVidia to just open-source the drivers already.

       

      auryx

    • #63070
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      I switched to nVidia about five years back – they left ATI/AMD drivers standing when it came to OpenGL support.

      My only problem with nVidia is I can’t use Shadowplay without having GFE installed, and I dislike GFE.

    • #63071

       

       

      The second annoyance (which you’ve probably experienced) is the hassle of having to explicitly blacklist the nouveau drivers to make the proprietary one work every time you install a new OS, and also having to make sure that your driver is re-deployed every time you have a kernel update. Not major nuisances, but enough that I’d prefer nVidia to just open-source the drivers already.

      I see.  Actually I had NOT experienced that.  Unfortunately my main rig is in Windows limbo until I can acquire a nice 1TB SSD next month (which I have waited this long for because I REALLY don’t want to buy it because being 1TB it will be SATA which is really an obsolete technology by now… sigh) so that I can do dual boot and have plenty of room for games.  Therefore I’ve had embarrassingly little recent experience with nVidia drivers in Linux.  And yes, that definitely sounds like it would piss me off, and in fact I’m glad we had this conversation, because it probably would not have occurred to me that there were pre-installed open source drivers conflicting with the nVidia drivers (that was not the case 6 years ago).  The package manager should allow you to remove the open source drivers though I suppose it might automatically re-install them every time it updates the kernel.  Which distribution are you using?

       

      And yes, I can’t really see any reason not to open source hardware drivers (even though I have no objection to using proprietary ones).  After all, they are provided as a free service and you need to actually buy their hardware to take advantage of it anyway.  I suppose they must think that they have some terribly clever optimizations that they don’t want AMD to see, but that seems like a pretty frail argument to me.

    • #63072

      auryx
      Participant

      I see.  Actually I had NOT experienced that.  Unfortunately my main rig is in Windows limbo until I can acquire a nice 1TB SSD next month (which I have waited this long for because I REALLY don’t want to buy it because being 1TB it will be SATA which is really an obsolete technology by now… sigh) so that I can do dual boot and have plenty of room for games.  Therefore I’ve had embarrassingly little recent experience with nVidia drivers in Linux.  And yes, that definitely sounds like it would piss me off, and in fact I’m glad we had this conversation, because it probably would not have occurred to me that there were pre-installed open source drivers conflicting with the nVidia drivers (that was not the case 6 years ago).  The package manager should allow you to remove the open source drivers though I suppose it might automatically re-install them every time it updates the kernel.  Which distribution are you using?

       

      And yes, I can’t really see any reason not to open source hardware drivers (even though I have no objection to using proprietary ones).  After all, they are provided as a free service and you need to actually buy their hardware to take advantage of it anyway.  I suppose they must think that they have some terribly clever optimizations that they don’t want AMD to see, but that seems like a pretty frail argument to me.

       

      I used Fedora for years, and have recently moved onto using Arch. The distros are getting better at handling this nVidia pain, and in fact Arch seems to do it better than many others – simply installing the nVidia package automatically blacklists nouveau and keeps the driver up-to-date with kernel upgrades, which is quite handy (although I did have an issue where nouveau didn’t support my graphics card, which meant I had to remember to install nVidia when building the OS or else risk booting into a blank screen…..). Anyway, with luck, the hassles will soon be a thing of the past.

    • #63073

      I finally set up dual boot with Ubuntu last weekend.  It was a somewhat nerve-wracking experience because of some nVidia driver issues.  Because the nvidia drivers involve kernel modules which are not recognized by secure boot, one must disable secure boot to use them.  Of course, I would much rather have had secure boot disabled to begin with, since it seems that it can’t be anything other than a Microsoft conspiracy anyway, but I did not have the foresight to do this before installing Windows the first time, and now installing dual boot involves deleting one of the keys held by my BIOS.  There is zero documentation on the subject, so I just had to hope and pray that I was not deleting the Windows license key (fortunately my BIOS allows me to back up the deleted key on a USB drive).  Fortunately the key I deleted was NOT the Windows license key, and disabling dual boot fixed my Linux issues.  Thank god Windows didn’t seem to even notice that I disabled secure boot.  I definitely blame Microsoft for this unpleasant experience more than nvidia, but it definitely makes me share the frustration that nvidia won’t open source their drivers.

       

      Fortunately everything right now is working fine.  I am annoyed at Logitech for not having any Linux software, as this effectively prevents me from playing any space-sims on Linux.

    • #110126

      Anonymous

      My config:

      CPU intel i7 4770k (4ghz)
      Ram 8gb DDR3 1600 mhz
      motherboard: asrock z87 extreme 3
      VGA: radeon rx 480 8gb XFX GTR Black
      PSU: corsaire cs650m

      Next upgrades for 2017:
      A new monitor…probably samsung cf24 curved monitor with freesync
      16gb ram
      SSD HD for the operating system

      Upgrade for 2018:

      Another rx 480 in crossfire! Yeah that rocks!

    • #110143
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Nice machine Natan

      I am hoping to build a new gaming PC near Christmas with all the latest stuff with AMD Ryzen processor and new AMD Vega gfx card.

      How do you like the the R480? I wanted to buy one to stick in my existing machine and give it to my son, does it play games well?

    • #110482

      Anonymous

      Hi, all!
      SSD 500GB +Hard Drive 1TB
      GeForce GTX 1050 Ti
      AMD Athlon X4-880K
      16GB DDR4
      I saved money for a game PC for a long time, finally, I ordered it on the Amazon. At first, I thought to try to build a PC myself but quickly abandoned this idea – because there was neither time nor proper knowledge. I chose from several models but stopped at one of the cheapest. However, this “cheap” is not cheap at all, and seems to be very good)
      Of course in my soul, I have fallen in love with StormForce Hurricane, but the price does not just bite but tries to eat you whole. I watched the comparison of gaming PCs https://www.bestadvisers.co.uk/best-gaming-pcs, and was pleasantly surprised that my performance is very similar to one of the most expensive PCs)

    • #110483

      Geraldine
      Participant

      Nice machines all round folks! 🙂
      Recently I upgraded my old PC with a AMD 8350 Piledriver CPU, a 8 GIG ASUS RX480, a 1TB Hybrid Drive, 16 GIGs of RAM and downgraded back to 64 bit Win 7. Very pleased with the results, rock solid in Fallout 4, Elite Dangerous and Star Citizen all running at max detail at 1080p. Darkone? An RX480 is a good choice for 1080p gaming in my view.

    • #110485

      Anonymous

      Darkone said:

      Nice machine Natan

      I am hoping to build a new gaming PC near Christmas with all the latest stuff with AMD Ryzen processor and new AMD Vega gfx card.

      How do you like the the R480? I wanted to buy one to stick in my existing machine and give it to my son, does it play games well?

      Sorry for my unswer after 5 months but i read this only today!
      Anyway i’m finding very well with rx480…the card is cheap and very fast. I bought an xfx GTR one…it has a better dissipation system.
      I played with a lot of different games…from assassin creed’d unity to rise of tomb rider, elite, shadow of mordor, etc etc…the games are smooth.
      With vulkan in doom 4 it’s simply perfect!
      I always had nvidia cards until 2011…3 nvidia cards burned literally (2 8800 GT in sli and a 8800 GTS) in 2 years…then i bought an amd 6850 and i used it until september 2016! That card worked very well and it continues to work on another computer. After the 6850 positive experience i decided to buy another amd.
      Today every console is amd based from cpu tu gpu…so i think there is a good evolution in AMD.
      Anyway also nvidia are very good cards…both of the trends are good, it’s only a matter of what you prefer.

      p.s. How works quoting in post?

    • #110491
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Thanks Natan

      Now that AMD has come out with the RX580’s and they are just a tad higher than a RX480 I will probably go with that for my son this Xmas. Thanks for your feedback on this because I was hoping these cards could play the games he likes to play at decent framerates for the next few years.

      I am slowly putting together my PC buying a little bit at a time, I will buy my tempered glass case next month. When I build it all I will post some pics and list all the components.

      On the quoting, copy the text you want to quote into your thread, highlight the code you want to quote with the mouse and click on the ‘Format’ button and click on ‘quote’ and that should do it for you like this:

      > p.s. How works quoting in post?

    • #110494
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Geraldine, won’t you run into some issues soon with some games since they are now starting to make Windows10 only games, I thik I read the other day that some gfx cards are also starting to require only windows10 so for those who are Win7 your time is limited when it comes to hardware and software options.

      I am on Windows10 now and its not bad, but I just need better gfx but my pc is over 4yrs old so I need a new one. But I will at least future proof myself, or try to 🙂

    • #110495

      Geraldine
      Participant

      I am going to hold out for as long as I can D1. I used Win 10 for nearly a year and just couldn’t take to it. :/ The ability to control updates being taken away from me as well as all the spyware guff it installs just put me right off it. I might upgrade to Windows 8.1 later but that’s as far I will go until Micro$oft stop making mailware ridden software. It’s an OS I want not a store front or something that is watching every move I make to “enhance” my shopping experience. Do you have any idea what they are doing with all that uploaded data they are getting? Cos I sure as hell don’t.
      Maybe Windows 11 or 12 will be the charm.
      In the meantime if this “telemetry software” is a concern to any Win 10 users out there, consider these two utilities:
      [Spybot Anti Beacon](https://www.safer-networking.org/spybot-anti-beacon/ “Spybot Anti Beacon”)
      [O&O Shut up](https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10 “O&O Shut up”)
      I used both of these while I had Win 10 installed and it made it bearable…just, but the auto updates were what finally killed it for me. It’s my PC so I want to control what the heck it does and when it updates. Why can’t Micro$oft see that? Until they do I will hang on to the older OSs thank you very much. 😉

      In the meantime, I’ve had rock solid performance from my Win 7 install, no issues and can still pick and choose what updates on it, perfect. I see Win 7 as the real successor to the mightly missed Win XP. Now that was an OS that Micro$soft did a great job on. I’d love to see them make an updated XP in fact for their next OS.

      Also check this out…
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5mFI9spp10

      As for the latest games coming out being only for Win 10, well I am a retro gamer at heart so it’s not likely to effect me that much. Heck, if it gets that bad, I will simply dig out my old Amiga 1200! 😀

    • #110496
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      > some gfx cards are also starting to require only windows10

      Not only GPUs, D1 – the latest intel CPUs (and mobos too, I think) **require** WX. I’m also sticking with Win7 Pro SP1, which I’m currently running clean (from the OEM DVD), completely unpatched, with the Windows Update service disabled in msconfig, so no sly updates/backporting of telemetry mierda! No updates at all, in fact. My machine runs fast and smooth – that’s how an OS should work. WX is verging on malware, and that pajero SatNad will be one of the first against the wall when the revolution comes!

      Buenas tardes, amigos!

    • #110498

      Geraldine
      Participant

      Cody!!! Buena noches to you my friend. 🙂 I kinda knew that you too would be a Win 7 holdout and yes your right about the CPUs. The video above explains that and that is why I stopped short of getting a bang upto date CPU, but the AMD Piledriver I currently have is plenty powerful for what I use it for. I’ve had no issues at all with Win 7. The only thing I wished I had done was get the Pro version instead of Home Premium because I am limited to 16 GIGs of RAM. But again it’s more than enough for me.
      Fly safe out there Cody! o/
      Oh! And Oolite still runs fine too on Win 7, which is nice. 😉

    • #110499
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      I too have 16GB of RAM in my i5 4670K GTX770 machine (4 years old now). Who’d have thought it twenty-odd years ago – my first home desktop had 4MB of RAM, and a tiny HDD (70MB, I think, of which MS Office – 32×3.5″ floppies – took a large chunk).

      My problem may occur if I ever need DX12 – ain’t getting that backported to Win7, methinks! If Win7 became unusable, I’d seriously consider Linux – tried it once, a long time ago, and it didn’t grab me!

      I’m upgrading to a 144Hz G-Sync monitor soon – looking forward to that, I am!

    • #110501

      Geraldine
      Participant

      I just use a plain LCD TV as a monitor these days. Another good reason for picking the RX480 as a graphics card as it performs very well at 1080p. If I went for a higher resolution my knackered old eyes couldn’t tell the difference so what I have seems the best compromise, for me at least. 😉
      That’s a fine PC you have there Cody tho! 🙂

    • #110502
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      > That’s a fine PC you have there Cody tho!

      Aye, all contained within a very good case too – whisper quiet, excellent airflow, efficient dust filters. Gotta love [Fractal Design](http://www.fractal-design.com/home/product/cases/arc-series/arc-midi-r2 “Fractal Design”) and their 140mm fans. As for having knackered old eyes, I know all about that!

    • #110798
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      FINALLY I HAVE BUILT A NEW GAMING PC 🙂 Whoohooo I can play games again haha

      I will post some pics tonight or this weekend (I have to clean off my desk too… haha ) …. but below is the the SSC Gaming rig

      Processor: Ryzen 1800x cooled with a Cosair H60 Water Cooler
      MB: MSI X370 Gaming Pro Carbon
      Memory: G.Skill Flare X DDR4 3200 16GB (its running at 3200mhz)
      Gfx: Gigabyte Radeon RX Vega 64XTX 8GB Water Cooled
      HDD: WD Black 256GB M.2 2280 (for OS) and Seagate Firecuda 2TB SATA3 (for gaming and storage)
      PWR: EVGA Supernova 850W G3
      Case: Corsair Tempered Glass 460X (this looks nice btw)
      Keyboard: G.Skill Ripjaws KM780R Cherry MX (still getting used to the key placement I mistype all the time)
      Mouse: G.Skill Ripjaws MX780
      Monitor: LG 34CB88-p 34″ Curved Ultrawide 3440×1440 (this is a nice monitor)

      Total build for all of this was just under $2400, which isn’t bad when you see whats in the build and just the monitor and gfx card was half that cost. I wanted to get a 4k monitor, but freesync 4k curved monitors were just too high priced I wasn’t gonna pay almost $1k for one.

      I am happy, kind of a reward for all the shit I been through over the past 2yrs. I want to buy another 16GB of memory but thats the only thing I would change. This rig is solid and not one hiccup with this build thus far and it plays everything I throw at it.

      I might try some overclocking but right now there is no need since it rocks everything, I played with the The Division during the free weekend last week and I maxed all settings and it was always over 60fps at 3440×1440 so I am loving it.

      Maybe I will create some youtube videos now 😮

      Some pics:






    • #110814
      CaptainKal
      CaptainKal
      Participant

      Way to go!!
      I bought the parts to build mine. Ryzen 1700x cooled with a Noctua NHU12s, on an Asus ROG Strix X370. Same memory as your configuration (and extremely expensive to be honest!!) I kept my old AMD R9 290, since I cannot find a a decent prized RX Vega 56, anywhere in Europe (in those e-shop that can deliver to Greece at least). I am still using 1080p, for gaming. No need for me to upgrade to 4K.

    • #110816
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Oh I agree CaptianKal, the memory is great and works amazing with Ryzen I would recommend but man the prices are high, I was able to pick it up for $188, its $233 right now. If I can get another set for lest than $190 I will try to get 16GB more.

      I have zero complaints on the Ryzen processor it is an amazing performer. I paid just under $700 for that Vega64 water cooled card but I am also trying to future proof the machine, yeah I thought about 4k but really there isn’t much difference between 2k and 4k, so I went with better performance long term with 3440×1440. Plus the majority of games don’t support the big resolutions.

      I went all out because I hope this thing can last 5-7yrs and still be a good rig. 🙂

    • #110821
      CaptainKal
      CaptainKal
      Participant

      I was able to pick it up for $188, its $233 right now.

      You are in luck. Mine cost nearly 270 euros!!!!! Prices on GPU’s and memory have skyrocketed!!! An rx 580 costs nearly 400 euros!!!

    • #110826
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Why is the memory so damn expensive? Your not allowed to get usa prices by ordering through newegg?

      Crypto miners have ruined the AMD card market because their cards are good at that stuff and they buy them up making less stock for the legit gamer to buy 🙁

    • #110827
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      It’s always been that way, D1 – what costs a dollar in the States costs a pound in the UK, pretty much.
      As for ordering components from the US, different taxes/duties apply so there’s little or no saving.

      I’ve started slowly collecting components for a new build, but it’ll be partially old spec.

    • #110845
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      It must be Christmas or something! Just saw my favourite case on special offer at £59.99 – so I grabbed it.

    • #110874
      CaptainKal
      CaptainKal
      Participant

      It’s always been that way, D1 – what costs a dollar in the States costs a pound in the UK, pretty much.
      As for ordering components from the US, different taxes/duties apply so there’s little or no saving.

      Not to mention, that you pay additional import taxes, when you buy something outside of EU!!

    • #110876
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      Added some pics to my original post, some came out a little blurry.

      I’ve started slowly collecting components for a new build, but it’ll be partially old spec.

      That’s what I did Cody, took me over 6mos too get everything I wanted. I picked things up on sale or with rebates and stuff like that. This whole setup would be over $3.2k if I didn’t price shop. Heh I might be able to play Star Citizen now 🙂 Merry Christmas!

    • #110877
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      It took me over a year to gather the components for the machine I’m running now. The new build should take less time: the CPU is awaiting dispatch, as is the case, I’ve already got the mobo and soundcard, and I’ve got a new monitor too. Still to buy: PSU, RAM, SSD, GFX card and keyboard.

    • #110880

      Geraldine
      Participant

      That’s a nice system D! 🙂

    • #110881
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      Looks like your love of AMD will stand you in good stead:

      Design flaw in intel processors… and the upcoming OS fixes may slow your machine down. Article (at El Reg) here.

      Naughty intel… very naughty!

    • #110882
      sscadmin
      sscadmin
      Administrator

      I just read about that the other day. Always been a AMD buyer, I guess because they are the little guy. This build was 100% AMD build and everything is running great, if you do your homework you can really build yourself a solid performer that will last many years. My last PC that is now my sons gaming machine has been running for 5 yrs without one issue.

      But I think AMD is the way to go for right now especially for DX12 performance for the cost.

    • #110884
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      Just when you thought AMD was secure, Spectre raises its ugly head.

    • #110885
      Cody
      Cody
      Participant

      Question for you, D1: that EVGA PSU – fully modular, yes? Any problems with cables being a tad short? It’s on my short list, you see, and I’ve heard a few gripes about short cables. Mine will have to stretch around the back of the mobo too.

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